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School Improvement Plan
 

Tennessee School Improvement
Plan

 

Goodlettsville Middle School

300 S. Main Street

Goodlettsville, Tennessee 37072

(615) 859-8956

Sarah Moore@mnps.org

Sarah Moore, Ed.D. Principal

School Year 2011/2012

Goodlettsville Middle School

School Improvement Plan

 

Assurances

I certify that Goodlettsville Middle School has utilized the data and other requirements requested for each component. The school will operate its programs in accordance with all of the required assurances and certifications for each program area.

I CERTIFY that the assurances referenced above have been satisfied to the best of my knowledge.

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________ ______________________

Signature of Principal Date Signed


 

Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.1: SIP Leadership Team Composition

(Rubric Indicator 1.1)


 

TEMPLATE 3.1.a: Curricular Practices

Template 3.1.a: Curricular Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.1 and 3.2)

Current Curricular Practices

3.TDOE and MNPS Standards are used and staff is trained in their use.

Curriculum is mapped and prioritized

School has established school-wide student achievement benchmarks

School has implemented a grade appropriate cohesive standards based model for literacy

School has implemented a grade appropriate cohesive standards based model for mathematics

School has implemented formative assessment aligned with the school benchmarks

Support system is in place for enhancing the quality of curriculum and instruction

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

MNPS standards are based on national and state standards. These standards are given to each teacher yearly. The coach has worked with grade level teams to ensure that all aspects of the standards are understood. All teachers were trained in the new national standards during the summer, and/or fall of 2011. In addition, the new evaluation process ensures that teachers must be familiar and use our latest standards. Common Core Standards have been introduced, training has occurred and more training will be occurring.

All disciplines and grade levels are required to use the MNPS developed pacing guides. Team levels meet weekly to review each teacher’s progress. All available data has been made available to grade teams and teachers and student instructional priority is placed on individual learners’ non-mastery.

All students are expected to meet or exceed proficiency or achieve a 10% gain in achievement levels. Students who are proficient are expected to move to an adequate yearly progress level or advanced proficiency.

A literacy model using guided reading, read-alouds, and a move toward integrated literacy in a reading workshop format is in place. Kylene Beers and Janet Allen strategies and materials are used. GMS is also moving toward implementing an integrated literacy model with reading occurring across the curriculum.

GMS has implemented a comprehensive mathematics program using a balanced math program approach. In addition, Marilyn Burns’s strategies and lessons are used in the classrooms.

GMS uses the Discovery Education Predictive Assessment tool to assess each student’s level of objective mastery. This assessment tool is aligned with state benchmarks. Formative writing assessments have been introduced which align with the required state writing assessment. Reading growth is being monitored using an online reading program.

GMS staff utilize MNPS training opportunities

as evidenced on the Electronic Register System. In addition, additional training is available using school and system Title I dollars for training that supports our needs as dictated by our school data.

Embedded training and teacher support provided by the consulting teacher. MNPS is providing a pilot program for the integration of social studies units with literacy instruction in a fifth grade classroom and an eighth grade classroom. In addition, MNPS is providing Princeton Review materials for teachers to use in the seventh and eighth grade for interventions to support teacher instruction .

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Janet Allen, Kylene Beers, Robert Probst

Practices supported by research by: Douglas A. Grouws and Kristin J. Cebulla, Ralph T. Mason and P. Janelle McFellors, Polya, Garofals and Lester, etc.

Yes

Marzano

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

Effective

Effective

Effective

Data not available at GMS yet

Data not available for GMS yet

Effective

Effective

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

All faculty members have been given training in new federal standard. GMS made AYP in 2010/2011.

Team meeting minutes are given to administration and documented



TCAP gains

TCAP gains

TCAP gains

TCAP gains

TCAP gains

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Reading scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Reading scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Reading scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

. Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Reading scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Readingscores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Reading scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Reading scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.1% in 2010/2011. Gain of 13.4% in math from 19.9% t0 33.3%.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

The district made the commitment to train every MNPS teacher. In addition, the consulting teacher assists in mapping out the standard when assistance is needed. The MNPS website also provides support in the mapping of the standards and a pacing guide.

Coaches and a district website provide a mapped standards check list for all disciplines at all grade levels in the beginning of the year. The coach and the administration continue to monitor their usage.

The coach and the administration meet with the faculty at the beginning of the school year to review the new benchmarks as established by NCLB.

For the past five years MNPS has provided training for the district-wide Reading Initiative .In addition GMS paired with another middle school to provide training on the teaching of students of poverty.

All math teachers were trained in Springboard by the end of October 2007. All math teachers are encouraged to attend all district provided workshops in the use of Marilyn Burns’s math strategies and manipulatives. training.

All teachers are expected to have completed their Discovery Education test using manual tests. A schedule is established and is monitored each year to ensure testing is completed.

Embedded professional assistance is provided via a consulting teacher

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Teams will continue to meet to use of standards and assist new teachers in their implementation. Team Leaders will review standards taught and report at the Leadership (Curriculum) meeting

Teams will continue to meet to ensure use of standards and assist new teachers in their implementation. Teams will continue to meet to ensure use of standards and assist new teachers in their implementation

GMS will continue to strive to meet NCLB benchmarks by monitoring the S.I.P. and reviewing assessment data. 7th and 8th grade math teachers plan together and prepare common benchmark tests.

Consulting teacher will continue to monitor literacy model usage and coach where needed.

Administration and Coach will continue to encourage teachers to attend more professional development in math and to expand their use of hands-on manipulatives in math. The two web-based math programs are Tennessee standards based and their usage is monitored. In addition, real world problems are being used in math classrooms.

Discovery Education , TCAP, IXL tests, Apangea results, myOn assessments and other teacher assessments will be used to monitor student’s academic growth

GMS has a consulting teacher. Team meetings are held and ideas exchanged, time for attending other teachers’ classes is given, and professional development off site occurs.

 

 




Template 3.1.b: Curriculum Gap Analysis


Instructional Practices

Template 3.2.a: Instructional Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.3 and 3.4)

Current Instructional Practices

11)Classroom instruction is aligned with the standards based curriculum

 

 

Classroom instruction is aligned with the assessments.11







Teaching is data driven.













Teachers incorporate a wide range of research based, student centered strategies.

 

 

Classroom organization and management techniques support the learning process.

 

 

 

Students are provided with multiple opportunities to receive additional assistance to improve their learning beyond the initial classroom instruction 4

 

2

Classroom instruction supports the learning of students with diverse cultural and language background and with different learning needs and learning styles

 

 

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

Weekly grade level team meetings review lesson plans and ensure that all teachers are using the new state standards. Lesson plans are reviewed to ensure that the standards are being followed.

TCAP assessments are reviewed and the school year is started with the knowledge of our strengths and challenges within disciplines and subgroup issues. After Discovery Education testing is done, each teacher organizes instruction around the results, and also develops a personalized learning plan for placing each student in the groups needed for the teaching of non-mastered objectives.

TCAP assessments are reviewed and the school year is started with the knowledge of our strengths and challenges within disciplines and subgroup issues. After Discovery Education testing is done, each teacher organizes instruction around the results, and also develops a Personalize Learning Plan for placing each student in the groups needed for the teaching of non-mastered objectives.

GMS teachers in math and language arts use curriculum that is based on student centered, brain researched strategies. Science teachers use the Pathways to College science kits and text that is based on state standards.

MNPS is providing a pilot program for the integration of social studies units with literacy instruction in a fifth grade classroom and an eighth grade classroom. In addition, MNPS is providing Princeton Review materials for teachers to use in the seventh and eighth grade for interventions to support teacher instruction .

Cooperative learning centers, student led lessons, lessons tied to standards, guided practice opportunities are provided, student work and assignments are differentiated, and students work collaboratively with teachers to construct lessons. The consulting teacher offers support in these areas.

#17

GMS provides teacher assisted tutoring from 3:45 – 5:00 p.m. Monday through Thursdays in both reading and math. In addition, many teachers volunteer to work individually with students during lunch or afternoon in an informal setting. An intervention period has been inserted into each students’ daily schedule to assist in remediation or enrichment.

MNPS is providing a pilot program for the integration of social studies units with literacy instruction in a fifth grade classroom and an eighth grade classroom. In addition, MNPS is providing Princeton Review materials for teachers to use in the seventh and eighth grade for interventions to support teacher instruction .

Students within the classrooms are moved from one group to another as they gain in mastery of skills. After analyzing various formative tests the students are moved either by reaching proficiency in Discovery Education gains and/or in classroom daily and weekly tests. Exceptional education students are moved not only in classroom skill groups, but also into regular education classrooms in all disciplines when testing results indicate the student’s ability to progress in that setting.

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes

Yes

Marzano, Allen, Beers, etc., provide data that indicates that students who combine collective intelligence produce greater gains in academic mastery.

Yes

Yes

Practices supported by research by: Douglas A. Grouws and Kristin J. Cebulla, Ralph T. Mason and P. Janelle McFellors, Polya, Garofals and Lester, etc. (math)

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year. This will continue to be monitored for effectiveness with the academic demands of the new state standards

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

This will continue to be monitored for effectiveness with the academic demands of the new state standards

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

This will continue to be monitored for effectiveness with the academic demands of the new state standards

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year. This will continue to be monitored for effectiveness with the academic demands of the new state standards

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year. This will continue to be monitored for effectiveness with the academic demands of the new state standards

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year. This will continue to be monitored for effectiveness with the academic demands of the new state standards

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)



Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011



Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011



Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011



Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011



Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011



Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011

TCAP, Discovery Education, formal and informal classroom assessments.

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)









Evidence of equitable school support for this practice















Standards given to each stakeholder.

All teachers are expected to utilize the computer labs to complete the assessments. The media specialist ensures that all teachers are scheduled for computer lab use. All teachers are trained in the use of and analyzing of the data instruments.















All data is expected to be used and incorporated into personalized learning plans for students.















All lesson plans are reviewed by the school principals. The principals and the coaches conduct classroom observations.

All new teachers were given time to go to the Classroom Management Training workshop provided by MNPS when available. In addition the consulting teachers provide support. Instructional rounds are conducted to ensure that all teachers are using research based classroom strategies.













Brochures were sent home to all students. Additional letters were sent to students at or near proficiency levels on the 2009/2010 TCAP test. E-mails and phones calls were also used to communicate opportunities to parents.



Next Step (changes or continuations)





Continue strategies





Continue using all GMS assessment tools

Continue to require teachers to use all available assessment tools and to communicate those scores with all stakeholders





Continue with formal and informal observations.





Continue with formal and informal observations.



Continue with Title I tutoring as long as these funds are available.



Continue the above listed strategies.


TEMPLATE 3.2.b: Instructional Gap Analysis



Template 3.2.b: Instructional Gap Analysis

 


TEMPLATE 3.3.a: Assessment Practices



Template 3.3.a: Assessment Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.5 and 3.6)



Current Assessment Practices

Uses student assessments aligned with Tennessee Department of Education standards based curriculum

The appropriate assessments are used to guide decisions relative to student achievement

Assesses all categories of students

Provides professional development in the appropriate use of assessment

Provides support and technical assistance to teachers in developing and using assessments

Provides assessment information to communicate with students, parents and other stakeholders regarding student learning

Uses a wide range of assessments, CRT, NRT, portfolio, curriculum based assessments

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

Discovery Education is a are specific performance indicator based assessment

aligned with Tennessee Department of Education standards.

Results of tests are analyzed and compared to TCAP results to ensure that the assessments continue to align with TCAP and the specific performance indicators. Data warehouse is used to strategically assist students with individualize learning.

GMS reviews all categories to ensure that all students are receiving the instructional strategies they need as evidenced by disaggregated data.



18

GMS has provided training in Discovery Education Training in the math problem solving process was provided to all math teachers by trained faculty members. MNPS provides writing assessment training each year. In addition teachers have been trained in Voyager Math assessment. Rick Wormeli dvds are available to teachers to gain knowledge on latest assessment best practices . Use of an online reading program that supplies student lexile levels has been purchased. 17

A consulting teacher provides embedded professional development on topics that teachers request assistance in.

Each year a Parent Night is held to explain the Discovery Education assessments. Parent/teacher conferences, phone calls and progress reports assist in communicating student asses-ment.TVASS projections and Discovery Education data is printed and given to teachers, parents, and students when the data becomes available.

As a MYP school, GMS uses portfolios for continued assessment of our students. All of GMS’s text books and assessments are aligned with state standards. In addition,

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

The assessments are successful in direct relationship to the classroom teacher’s willingness to embrace the practice. GMS recognizes that this would not be accomplished in the first year that coaches were employed

GMS believes that the teachers will gain from more professional development in best practices in assessment. Thus, there is not solid data on effectiveness yet.

Lexile levels, running records, Discovery Education, and Voyager Math assessments are administered to all students and provide timely data for driving instruction.









What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

100% of the math and reading teachers use the Discovery Education assessment tool.

The data sources are the research that the companies have conducted to assure that the assessment tools are aligned with state standards and are accurate in predicting and assessing objective mastery.

TCAP data disaggregated by the state, and district.

Continued training offered by the data team and Paul Changas (data specialist), on-going training in the reading initiative for the middle schools

Continued training offered by the district in data team and, Paul Changas (data specialist), on-going training in the reading initiative for the middle schools

Agenda minutes, administration observations, written log of parent communication

Discovery Education produces reports on all teacher classes as well as individual students, MYP requires portfolio production

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

The new data warehouse allows teachers to provide a concise and accurate “picture” of each student’s academic profile.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

GMS has 3 computer labs to schedule and use the programs to assess student achievement.

All math and language arts teachers are required to use Discovery Education

Weekly team meetings are held and the assistant principal, Mr. Jones and the coache works with the teachers to understand strengths and challenges of the various subgroups.

District provided workshops on an on-going schedule, both during the school year and during the summer months

All teachers have access to the designated staff. The Title I Parent Involvement Coordinator, school counselors, and the MYP coordinator are readily available. All have time allocated to assist classroom teachers.

Parent/teacher conferences, parent activity nights, and special meetings are conducted to explain how various tests are used to communicate student related information

Continued data review of all assessments and communicated at team meetings. These findings are then communicated to the leadership team.

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Continue to use. Train new teachers

Continue to use.

GMS will continue to meet weekly and review all information on each child and the various subgroups

Continue to encourage all teachers to avail themselves of the workshop opportunities.

Continue using Title I dollars to train new staff after school. Continue to use planning days to train new teachers to effectively use all assessments.

Continue the above activities and seek out other methods to communicate academic achievement levels to all stakeholders, such as e-mails and newsletters. More and more information is being added to the website.

Continue to provide staff with the assessments and the training necessary to use the assessments.















 






TEMPLATE 3.4.a: Organizational Practices



Template 3.4.a: Organizational Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.7and 3.8)



#TEMPLATE 3.4.b: Organizational Gap Analysis

Template 3.4.b: Organizational Gap Analysis

Organizational Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required



“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality organizational practices?)

TIME: GMS administrators have established an organizational chart that describes

each administrator’s duties. The list is given to the staff, thus, allowing the staff to know who will handle various areas, requests, etc. A Faculty handbook is given to the staff and discussed before school every August..

MONEY: MNPS provides staff according to enrollment as dictated by the district formula. However, as attendance was a concern this past school year, the administration used Title I dollars to pay for an additional .5 personnel to monitor attendance.

PERSONNEL: The general office assistant was added using Title I dollars since our enrollment did not support additional personnel.

OTHER RESOURCES: GMS has a small pool of parent volunteers to assist in the classroom, and provide extra supervision during Orientation Days. In addition, there are alumni and other private donors that provide monetary assistance for special school activities.

“What Ought to Be” – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

* TIME:

* School counselors and a guidance clerk are needed to be on payroll the same time as the principals to start the school year in order to register new families and prepare for student orientation.

*

* MONEY:

* GMS would benefit with enough money to cover the costs of the “ought tos” in this section.

*

* PERSONNEL:

* GMS would benefit from a MNPS funded general office assistant. This position is needed for entering school data and monitoring student attendance.

*

GMS would benefit with a program assistant. The physical plant of the school is in four buildings and three portables. Classroom instruction would benefit with more teacher observations and less class time wasted with discipline issues. The program assistant would be in close proximity to the 5th and 6th grade students and teachers to assist the students being supervised as they go into the other buildings and portables. An additional campus supervisor is needed due to the layout of the physical plant. This would assist in ensuring that students would not skip class. GMS would benefit with the MAC program. Many of our exceptional education students and below proficiency students would specially benefit from not being suspended from school for disciplinary reasons. This program would address discipline issues and increase the school/student attendance rate while giving the student the opportunity to complete his/her academic assignments. GMS would benefit from a cadre of highly qualified substitute teachers With the numerous professional development required trainings and other unforeseen

teacher absences, classroom instruction is suffering with a lack of dependable and qualified substitute teachers.



OTHER RESOURCES:

Our school is in need of the MAC Program to decrease out of school suspensions especially with our black males and exceptional education students.

GMS would benefit from a new HVAS system. Currently the classrooms have window a/c units which are extremely loud. The students cannot hear the teacher while instruction is being given. (approximate cost, $85,000)



Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Both administrators have an open door policy, and have given staff access to their cell phones for any need that arises. Periodic staff meetings are held on Tuesday mornings. When time or activities prevent the staff meeting, the principal e-mails the staff on all of the items that would have been on the agenda. A Faculty Advisory Committee exists for the faculty to voice any concerns. This committee works with the administration to solve any faculty concerns.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

GMS budgeted approximately $7,000, in addition to the salaries of the coaches, in 2009/2010 and 2010 and2011 to provide professional development for staff. All teachers are encouraged to use their 5 professional development days. Code 9 and Code 10 days are also available for our teachers who are attending either district or grant sponsored workshops. All math and language arts teachers at GMS have attended a 5-day Springboard training. Science and social studies teachers have available training through the district that focuses on hands-on, best practices strategies.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

GMS did not meet the need of African American students in math . Our reading/language arts scores surpassed the NCLB requirements for 2009/2011. We believe that with our continued usage of the Reading Initiative, usage of Springboard strategies, tutoring, and coaching we will again meet benchmarks in 2010/2011.






Template 3.4.c: Organization Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.8)

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required



What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Our major strengths in the school’s organization are as follows:

Six principals in four years dictated that the collaboration model the current administration employed was “top down management” until staff stability could be ensured. However, Dr. Moore immediately reorganized committees to ensure all stakeholders were involved in leadership opportunities. The committee that met to focus on curriculum, instruction, assessment, and organization at the school is as follows:

Title 1 NCLB Program Specialist

Numeracy Coach

Media Specialist

Exceptional education Team Leader

MYP Coordinator

Principal and Assistant Principal

Support Staff Member

Parent

5th – 8th Grade Team Members

School Counselor

Head Custodian

The following opportunities for collaboration of effective organization are seen as strengths at GMS are:

A principal who moves about the school soliciting input from all stakeholders, and is available to everyone via an open door policy.

A bi-weekly staff meeting where Principal Moore solicits input from the entire school staff and organizes and disseminates an agenda.

Weekly staff meetings chaired by team leaders having at least one team member of the administration attending.

Monthly meetings of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

A teacher who serves as the MNEA representative.

Weekly meetings with the coaches

Monthly meetings of the Student Council.

Monthly meetings of the Leadership Committee.

GMS uses all available data and the information analyzed by subgroups to determine how Title I funds and Stimulus money will be used.



Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required



What are our major challenges and how do we know.

The major challenges of the GMS organizational process currently and from a historical perspective are:

Parents do not live or work in a contiguous school zone making attendance during the school day and nightly meetings difficult.

“Struggling” PTS with inconsistent attendance.

A high mobility rate means that the students are not receiving consistent instruction. Many of our transferring students are not from MNPS schools. When school records are finally received, we find that many of these students are lacking basic skills.


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Goodlettsville Middle School
300 Main Street | Goodlettsville, TN 37072 | (615) 859-8956

 

 

 

Tennessee

Assessment Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required



“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

TIME:

GMS teachers are given some time before the start of school to read and analyze past data in the student records. A two day training in the use of available data to create academic profiles for students occurred during August 2010. When the data is posted on the State Web site, the new data is disseminated to the teachers and this data is used to place students in the appropriate classes and establish objectives early on in the school year for the students. In addition, data coaches are provided by the district to assist GMS in analyzing data. GMS plans to work with the cluster data coach frequently during the 2011/2012 school year to be strategic at identifying greatest need.

MONEY: MNPS has provided the Discovery Education assessments and training for teachers. GMS would like Title funds raised to 09/10 allocated levels to be able to train teachers in latest best practice strategies for assessment.

PERSONNEL: A team compiled of the faculty who have time not dedicated to the classroom has been designated to assist faculty in using quality assessment practices. The team consists of Dr. Sarah Moore, principal, Mr. Richard Jones, assistant principal, Alison Rager, MYP coordinator, and Ruth Gurich, NCLB program specialist.

OTHER RESOURCES:

.“What Ought to Be”

Additional days provided at the beginning of the school year to ensure that all assessments are put into personalized learning plans for the start of the school year. GMS also desires to use Reading 180 as a remediation program for our reading classes and tutoring programs.

MONEY:

Money needs to be budgeted for notebooks to house portfolios. Funding needs to remain in place for the Discovery Education and other research based remediation tools. Funds need to be elevated to ensure that the programs that are allowing GMS to make the gains in reading and math possible remain in place.

PERSONNEL:

An additional exceptional education teacher would allow full inclusion plus resource classes to occur. This additional support would also allow EE teachers more time to assist regular education teachers in creating assessments that better reflect the progress that each student in Exceptional Education is making.

OTHER RESOURCES:



Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Initially, the companies who produce the assessment tools provided GMS with on-site training. After this initial training, GMS staff ensure that all new teachers are trained in the various assessment tools. In addition, MNPS provides five professional leave days for professional development training. Embedded professional development is provided by the consulting teacher.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

All funds GMS spends are targeted for professional development and materials to increase our reading and math scores.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

GMS did make AYP in 2011/2012 and for all subgroups in both math and reading. The slowest growth was in our Hispanic population in reading/language arts. Their proficient/advanced percentages only rose from 28.9% to 30.9%. This will continue to be an area of focus.




TEMPLATE 3.3.c: Assessment Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.6)

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

GMS has many assessment tools to track the progress of each student. One tool, Discovery Education allows teachers to track the students three times a year, thus giving the teacher an extended time of instruction after the assessment to focus on any weaknesses. The portfolios allow staff to provide assessments in a differentiated manner.

Since GMS has used Discovery Education, all teachers have learned how to use the data provided by the reports to drive their instruction. This has been the most effective assessment tool for guiding classroom instruction. The TCAP assessment has been effective at assisting in the placement of students in the correct classrooms, but not overly effective in guiding weekly classroom instruction. Extended learning opportunities allow for a small group of students to be pre-tested and post-tested on individual objectives that our data reveals is needed.



Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major challenges and how do we know.

One challenge that GMS faces is in the area of communication. As most of our parents work and a majority of our students live out of the Goodlettsville community, parental involvement is limited and communication is difficult to achieve with parent on-site visits. Thus, even though the meetings are scheduled for communication of the assessment progress with ideas on how to help the student, good attendance is not always possible. GMS continues to provide varied times and activities where parents can meet teachers and discuss the progress of their children. The GMS Leadership Team has established a Parent Involvement Committee to raise the communication and participation level of parents at GMS.



Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

How will we address our challenges? 15

GMS has developed a yearly calendar for parent meetings to allow for planning on the part of the parents. The parent-school compact and the parent involvement policy are distributed and feedback is requested. Volunteers to work with the other stakeholders are solicited to continue to revise and modify these policies as the stakeholders deem necessary.

In addition, staff sets aside extended hours on parent/teacher conference days to accommodate as many parents with their time restraints as possible. Teachers are encouraged to call as often as possible with all pertinent information that may affect their child’s progress. The school and individual teachers send home newsletters to keep parents abreast of school news and activities. Positive information as well as challenges is encouraged to be exchanged. E-mail addresses are collected and this method is often used in communicating with parents. The MNPS call out phone system has been used on a regular basis to communicate with parents.




























TEMPLATE 3.4.a: Organizational Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.7and 3.8)



Current Organizational Practices

School’s beliefs, mission and shared vision define the purpose and direction for the school

School is organized to support a diverse learning community through its programs and practices

School provides continuous professional development for school leaders

School is organized to be proactive in addressing issues that might impede teaching and learning

Organizational practices and processes promote the effective time-on-task for all students

School is organized to engage the parents and community in providing extended learning opportunities for children

Organizational processes increase the opportunity for success in teaching and learning at all schools

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

The vision is posted in each classroom and review annually at planning days

GMS provides interventions for struggling readers, classes for high school credit for advanced students, an exceptional education program for students with disabilities, and an opportunity for students to participate in a gifted program.

District training, on-site training, collaborative training with other schools, and individually attended workshops. The consulting teacher provides embedded professional development.

The administration meets with the teams on a weekly basis to ensure that teaching and learning are not hindered.

In addition, a Faculty Advisory Committee exists in case any impediments occur that the staff does not feel comfortable addressing personally.

Announcements are not allowed during instructional time. Students are kept in close proximity by grade to ensure movement time is short between classes. Observations are conducted to ensure that students are on-task during instruction time.

An Academic Intervention Grant is being used to provide after school tutoring.

GMS reviews the schedule each year to find the most effective way to provide the most needed and appropriate instructional time for all students.GMS went to 7 periods to introduce an independent study period to provide additional time for interventions when necessary.

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes



Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes



Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

Effective

Effective

Being evaluated for effectiveness

Effective

Effective

Effective

The 7 period day is being reviewed for effectiveness.

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

Increased TCAP scores in past years.

Increased TCAP scores in past years



Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Student gain in both math and reading TCAP scores. Math scores increased from 31.6% in 2009/2010 to 41.

1% in 2010/2011.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

Vision statement is reviewed by the entire faculty and staff yearly. It is altered as ideas are gathered. The vision statement is posted in every room and other visible places in the school. All teachers sign a “formal” poster of the vision and it is posted in the front hallway.

Students are placed in classes determined by their TCAP scores in reading and math. If additional assessments show otherwise, the students are reviewed by the teacher, administration and counseling team to determine placement.

Workshops provided on an on-going schedule provided by the district

A Faculty Advisory Committee is established each year for teachers to communicate any instructional or organizational concerns.

All policies and procedures are found in the teacher handbook, reviewed each year at the staff meeting and applied to all staff.

Students are given student handbooks and regulations are discussed by their homeroom teacher.

Students who are close or just at or just above proficiency levels are identified and tutoring opportunities communicated to the parents in a variety of ways…brochures sent home in progress reports, teacher phone calls, etc. In addition, all students received a mailed letter explaining the programs available.

Students are placed in classes determined by their TCAP scores in reading and math. If additional assessments show otherwise, the students are reviewed by the teacher, administration and counseling team to determine placement. All 4th graders attend an orientation day prior to the beginning of the school year to meet staff. 16

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Continue

Continue

Continue

Continue

Continue

Continue as long as funding allows

Continue to research best practices from high producing schools and make changes as deemed appropriate












Organizational Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required



“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality organizational practices?)

TIME: GMS administrators have established an organizational chart that describes

each administrator’s duties. The list is given to the staff, thus, allowing the staff to know who will handle various

areas, requests, etc. A Faculty handbook is given to the staff and discussed before school every August.

MONEY: MNPS provides staff according to enrollment as dictated by the district formula. However, as attendance was a concern this past school year, the administration used Title I dollars to pay for an additional .5 personnel to monitor attendance.

PERSONNEL: The general office assistant was added using Title I dollars since our enrollment did not support additional personnel.

OTHER RESOURCES: GMS has a small pool of parent volunteers to assist in the classroom, and provide extra supervision during Orientation Days, Eye Screening Days, Yearbook activities, etc. In addition, there are alumni and other private donors that provide monetary assistance for special school activities.

“What Ought to Be” – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

* TIME: School counselors and a guidance clerk are needed to be on payroll the same time as the principals to start the school year in order to register new families and prepare for student orientation.

* MONEY: GMS would benefit with enough money to cover the costs of the “ought tos” in this section.

* PERSONNEL: GMS would benefit from a MNPS funded full time general office assistant. This position is needed for entering school data and monitoring student attendance. An additional campus supervisor is needed due to the layout of the physical plant. This would assist in ensuring that students would not skip class. GMS would benefit from a cadre of highly qualified substitute teachers With the numerous professional development required trainings and other unforeseen teacher absences, classroom instruction is suffering with a lack of dependable and qualified substitute teachers. GMS would also benefit from receiving funds from the School Improvement Grant as GMS is in School Improvement I, Improving this school year. This would be used to purchase an additional tutor to work with our 7th and 8th grade math students for intervention and enrichment supplements.

OTHER RESOURCES: GMS would benefit from a new HVAS system. Currently the classrooms have window a/c units which are extremely loud. The students cannot hear the teacher while instruction is being given. (approximate cost, $85,000)

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Both administrators have an open door policy, and have given staff access to their cell phones for any need that arises. Periodic staff meetings are held on Tuesday mornings. When time or activities prevent the staff meeting, the principal e-mails the staff on all of the items that would have been on the agenda. A Faculty Advisory Committee remains in place for the faculty to voice any concerns. This committee works with the administration to solve any faculty concerns. The new evaluation system will ensure that equity occurs due to its reliance on the gathering of evidence for the evaluations.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

GMS budgeted approximately $7,000, in addition to the salaries of the coaches, in 2009/2010 and 2010 and2011 to provide professional development for staff. GMS did not receive Title IIA funds for professional development for the school year 2011/2012. All teachers are encouraged to use their 5 professional development days. Code 9 and Code 10 days are also available for our teachers who are attending either district or grant sponsored workshops. Some GMS teachers attended Kagan training, history work shops, and COMP sessions this school year. During the summer of 2011 all GMS teachers attended AAIS trainings. In addition, many teachers attended summer EL and EE workshops conducted by each of those departments. Science and social studies teachers have available training through the district that focuses on hands-on, best practices strategies. An embedded coach is provided by the district to assist teachers in any areas they request.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

The increase in reading and math proficient and advanced scores from 2009/2010 to 2010/2011 reflect the continued proficiency growth of GMS students.

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required



What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Our major strengths in the school’s organization are as follows:



GMS has had Leadership Team training and the team now plays an integral role in making decisions for the school. Teachers have been position to provide the very best educational opportunities according to their teaching strengths.

 

The following opportunities for collaboration of effective organization are seen as strengths at GMS are:

  • A principal who moves about the school soliciting input from all stakeholders, and is available to everyone via an open door policy.
  • A monthly staff meeting where Principal Moore solicits input from the entire school staff and organizes and disseminates an agenda.
  • Weekly staff meetings chaired by team leaders having at least one team member of the administration attending.
  • Monthly meetings of the Faculty Advisory Committee.
  • Monthly meetings of the Leadership Committee.

GMS uses all available data and the information analyzed by subgroups to determine how Title I funds will be used.



Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major challenges and how do we know.

The major challenges of the GMS organizational process currently and from a historical perspective are:

  • A brand new Parent Involvement committee that is just learning all the requirements to meet federal regulations for compliance and the challenges involved in increasing parent involvement.
  • A high mobility rate means that the students are not receiving consistent instruction. Many of our transferring students are not from MNPS schools. When school records are finally received, we find that many of these students are lacking basic skills.
  • Reduced funding due to our making AYP





Component 5 – The School Improvement Plan and Process Evaluation

(Rubric Indicator 5.1)

Evidence of Collaborative Process – Narrative response required



What evidence do we have that shows that a collaborative process was used throughout the entire planning process?

Evidence that a collaborative process was used throughout the entire planning process for the School Improvement Plan is as follows:

The School Improvement Plan Committee at Goodlettsville Middle School is composed of a diversified group of stakeholders. Total involvement of all stakeholders is highly encouraged. The committee operates in an open manner and continuous input is sought not only from all committee members, but also from all stakeholders through a variety of methods. These methods include committee meetings, e-mails, individual meetings when they cannot make a committee meeting, and phone calls. This s that the plan remains customized and addresses the specific needs of the students and teachers at GMS.

The Leadership Committee guides the writing of the yearly plan for Goodlettsville Middle School and then oversees its implementations. Component Five of the SIP outlines how the Leadership Committee will monitor, adjust, and give feedback to the stakeholders of the school.

The Leadership Committee has created a calendar to 1) set the date for the annual review of this year’s plan, 2) send out to responsible member(s) a reminder of upcoming duties and timelines, 3) fix a schedule for periodic meetings to review progress on goals/action steps, and 4) gather data to form charts and tables to compare student pre-assessment and post-assessment achievement.

The Leadership Committee will take minutes at all meetings. These minutes will be printed for the entire staff for input on decisions made. The driving force of these meetings will be to: 1) successfully improve instruction and organization, 2) maintain our commitment to improvement, 3) provide resources and support, and 4) recognize and celebrate achievements.

One primary role of the Leadership Committee is to monitor the SIP and make recommendations back to Component Committees of any adjustments that need to be made in the action plans. The Leadership Committee will inform all stakeholders of its recommendations.

The Leadership Committee has set the first Tuesdays of January, March, and May to meet for monitoring, adjusting, and giving feedback on the School Improvement Plan. At the May meeting, the committee will formally review the entire SIP for the 2009/2010 school year.





Evidence of Alignment of Data and Goals – Narrative response required



What evidence do we have that proves alignment between our data and our goals?

GMS goals were developed directly from our reading, math, and attendance data from the2009/2010 TCAP data.

The obvious conclusion to the interpretation of this data is to continue to focus on the growth of our reading and language arts discipline and to increase our endeavors to reach NCLB benchmarks in math and reading in all of our subgroups. Researched based, effective strategies must be used. Monitoring of their consistent use is in place via our monitoring instruments as lined out in other components. We need to intensify our efforts to improve our math instructional strategies in our exceptional education department and continue to encourage development of best practices strategies in all areas. Since GMS African American students did not meet 09/10’s baseline benchmark, more remediation strategies were implemented in 2010/2011 to address these needs.

Evidence of Communication with All Stakeholders – Narrative response required



What evidence do we have of our communication of the TSIPP to all stakeholders?

A newsletter goes home to the parents in August informing the parents of yearly gains, areas for improvement and goals exceeded.

An annual meeting is held in August that informs parents of their rights under Title I and disseminates assessment information.

Parents are mailed a copy of their children’s TCAP scores with an explanation page to help the parents read the data. In addition, parents are encouraged to call their child’s school counselor or principal to ask questions.

During the August PTSO meeting, the principal presents the school results to the parents, students, and community leaders.

Scheduled Parent/Teacher conferences are held.

Family Activity Nights are scheduled in conjunction with our monthly PTSO meetings to encourage participation and communication with parents and the community.

In addition, a website has been created and information posted on it. The Leadership Committee created a gmail account that all can access with a user name to be able to read the School Improvement Plan and email suggestions for change, etc. to the Committee.





Evidence of Alignment of Beliefs, Shared Vision, and Mission with Goals – Narrative response required



What evidence do we have that shows our beliefs, shared vision and mission in Component 2 align with our goals in Component 4?

The beliefs, mission, and vision statements of Goodlettsville Middle School have been in process since the early 1990’s. This process began with a faculty brainstorming session to generate a list of needs which would have to be met in order for GMS to meet the expectations for the system’s overall improvement plan. A series of workshops were conducted called “Team Building and Goal Setting.” Upon the completion of the workshop, teams combined to condense and revise philosophies. Each year a committee including representatives of all stakeholders meets at the beginning of the school year to refine the statements and beliefs to ensure that the instrument remains a guide for the direction of the school’s goals. The committee meets late spring and early fall to review the statement. Revisions were made in 2010/2011 by the entire faculty to reflect goals established by the data received by parent surveys, TCAP, and other assessment instruments. Each year the statement is presented to the faculty and representatives of each stakeholder group for agreement or final revision.



Evidence of Alignment of Action Steps with Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Organization – Narrative response required

What evidence do we have that shows our action steps in Component 4 align with our analyses of the areas of curriculum, instruction, assessment and organization in Component 3?

After the data is analyzed and disseminated to the staff, the staff then meets in teams to review last year’s action steps and add new ones as determined by the new data. These action steps are recorded in the team level action plans on file in the principal’s office. The individual teacher then maps out a plan of action for her/his individual classes based on data on each student and on the team’s collaborative decisions.

The TCAP data, when it is available, is examined during the summer to ascertain class/schedule placement for the coming school year. Students who need to be placed in special classes are scheduled at that time. As soon as class TCAP results are released, the teacher is given his/her class results with the intent of reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of the results in order to adjust their teaching strategies for the coming year.

The Discovery Education final test is used to assist the teacher in focusing instructional time on skills in which the class lacks proficiency.

The BRI final test gives reading teachers the reading level that the student should begin his/her next school year.

GMS administrators use NCLB benchmarks met or not met to assist teachers in strengthening their teaching strategies and developing a professional development plan. TVASS scores are also used to evaluate teacher effectiveness.

All available data is reviewed over the summer by the administrators. In addition, the grade level team leaders, the Leadership team, the MYP coordinator, and the counselors meet at least twice to discuss the results and begin to develop a plan for the grade/subject for the upcoming school year.

The data analysis is handled as stated in the paragraphs under Assessment Instruments. All data is reviewed at weekly grade level team meetings.





Suggestions for the Process – Narrative response required

What suggestions do we have for improving our planning process?

GMS staff believes that additional planning time in the beginning of the year with the latest available data assists teachers to benefit from every teachable moment available. As TCAP scores were not available before the beginning of school, the staff did not have adequate time to fully assess student needs. Title I dollars could be used to pay for several days of data review before the “official” start of the school year, if the data is available. If that data is not available, Discovery Education scores from the previous school year could be analyzed for the students who are returning. The in-coming 5th graders and students new to our school would be assessed as quickly as possible on the Discovery Education assessment tool in the guidance office or in a large group in a computer lab.




Implementation Evaluation

(Rubric Indicator 5.2)

Evidence of Implementation – Narrative response required

What is our plan to begin implementation of the action steps?

The administration met with the entire staff at the beginning of the school year in August and developed a plan for the entire staff to participate in the School Improvement Plan process. It was decided that information would be given at grade level meetings. The related arts team would constitute a component. The rest of the grades would each work on a component. After the initial drafts of the components were finished, the committees would review a different committee’s component for agreement, changes, suggestions, and corrections. The components would then again be revamped by the original committee. The process would begin at the staff orientation at the beginning of the school year in August and would continue during the weekly grade level meetings throughout the year. The Leadership Committee completes the final review.

Three dates are set to monitor and assist the grade level committee members in reviewing and making constructive criticisms. The administration would inform the committees of all progress being made in all of the areas and update any changes.

The first meeting on the process was in August. The individual components were examined during the grade level meetings in the following months. During the first in-service/planning day each committee reported on their progress and time was given for the various committees to meet. It was decided that as soon as the goal/targets were developed they would be given to every teacher and stakeholder. This year the teams developed goals for their specific grade level, their individual classrooms, and each student. These goals will be combined to produce action steps that are relevant to the school’s academic progress. The teachers will post them in their rooms or in some visible area where the goals will serve to keep the instruction focused.

The goals will be analyzed at each meeting and a determination made as the GMS’s progress in reaching the goals. The data relevant to each grade level will be reviewed by the grade level team members. Areas of weaknesses will be identified and a plan of action that crosses all of the grades academic disciplines will be constructed in response to the data. Each team will present to the other teams the methods found effective at their grade level. For example, the 5th grade team began practicing for the writing assessment two years ago by writing to a prompt weekly in the same manner as the official writing assessment.

TCAP reports, State Report Card, Discovery Education assessments, disaggregation of data, No Child Left Behind Report, District Reading assessments, writing assessments, District Math Assessment, Gateway tests:

The above tools will be analyzed whenever new data becomes available in order to determine strengths and weaknesses of the plan. The various levels for proficiency are explained at staff orientation, the annual initial Title I parent meeting, and during the weekly regularly scheduled grade 2009/2010 data with the previous two years to determine the overall effectiveness of the plan. A summary of these findings will be made available to all stakeholders. Plans will be made for celebrating successes for the year.





Evidence of the Use of Data – Narrative response required

GMS uses the data given by MNPS plotted over a three year time period to show what trends have evolved and what areas need to be strengthened and what areas should be continued in the current manner. GMS reviews NCLB benchmarks, district goals, and report card scores. GMS data is compared with these benchmarks. The information is discussed at the weekly grade level meetings and in the monthly staff meetings. Revisions to our strategies are made according to our growth, or lack of growth, in terms of these long term goals.

Dr. Moore communicates all data analysis at staff meetings held on designated Tuesday mornings. In addition, an in depth review of our data is given at the beginning of the year during staff orientation which occurs in August before the students arrive, and at the end of the year when TCAP results and TVASS scores are analyzed. The TCAP results are analyzed at each grade level and the TVASS scores are discussed individually with each teacher. AAIS is providing consulting in the spring of 2010/2011 to assist teams in developing collegial conversations.

A summer meeting is held with the Leadership Committee, MYP coordinator, and the parent involvement coordinator to review the data and begin to think of strategies to strengthen each subject or grade.

School TCAP results are discussed using a PowerPoint presentation during the first PTSO meeting in August.

A newsletter goes home to the parents in August or as soon as the data is available informing the parents of yearly gains, areas for improvement and goals exceeded. If GMS students have the option of going to another school, it is reiterated in this newsletter. If GMS is required to send a letter home informing parents of their options, GMS communicates this information as clearly and positively as possible.

An annual meeting is held in August that informs parents of their rights under Title I and disseminates assessment information.



TEMPLATE 5.3: Monitoring and Adjusting Evaluation

(Rubric Indicator 5.3)

Evidence of Monitoring Dates – Narrative response required

What are the calendar dates (Nov/Dec and May/June) when the School Leadership Team will meet to sustain the Tennessee School Improvement Planning Process? Identify the person(s) responsible for monitoring and the role they will play in the monitoring process.

The dates that the Leadership Team meets are outlined as follows:

Twice monthly.

Dr. Sarah Moore, principal, Mr. Richard Jones, assistant principal will monitor the progress of the Leadership Committee in its role of sustaining the development of the School Improvement Plan.




Evidence of a Process for Monitoring Plan – Narrative response required

The School Improvement Plan (SIP) Leadership Committee guides the writing of the yearly plan for Goodlettsville Middle School and then oversees its implementations. Component Six of the SIP outlines how the Leadership will monitor, adjust, and give feedback to the stakeholders of the school.

The Leadership Committee has created a calendar to 1) set the date for the annual review of this year’s plan, 2) send out to member(s) responsible a reminder of upcoming duties and timelines, 3) fix a schedule for periodic meetings to review progress on goals/action steps, and 4) gather data to form charts and tables to compare student pre-assessment and post-assessment achievement. The Leadership Committee will take minutes at all meetings. These minutes will be printed for the entire staff for input on decisions made. The driving force of these meetings will be to: 1) successfully improve instruction and organization, 2) maintain our commitment to improvement, 3) provide resources and support, and 4) recognize and celebrate achievements. The primary role of the Leadership Committee is to monitor the SIP and make recommendations back to Component Committees of any adjustments that need to be made in the action plans.

The Leadership Committee will inform all stakeholders of its recommendations.





Evidence of a Process for Adjusting Plan – Narrative response required

The Leadership Committee has set the first Tuesdays of January, March, and May to meet for monitoring, adjusting, and giving feedback on the School Improvement Plan. At the May meeting, the committee will formally review the entire SIP for the 2010/2011 school year.





Evidence of a Plan for Communicating to All Stakeholders – Narrative response required



As stated, at each step in the implementation process there will be a review of individual components and communication at staff and grade level meetings of the status of the SIP. In addition, the process will be reported at the PTSO meetings and discussed. Any suggestions at any of the strategies will be noted and communicated at staff and grade level meetings.

Recommendations will be solicited at each of these meetings to address the concerns. The recommendations will be communicated to stakeholders via the meetings or e-mails when necessary.

The plan will monitor and adjusted as the data dictates that goals are being met or are not being met. The weekly grade level meetings will ensure that assessments are being monitored and concerns addressed. Updates will be given at each planning day and the administration will use the monitoring instrument for the implementation of the SIP plan to determine if all activities are on schedule.

Dr. Moore communicates all data analysis at staff meetings held on designated Tuesday mornings and other teacher only days. In addition, an in depth review of our data is given at the beginning of the year during staff orientation which occurs in August or as soon as the data is available before the students arrive, and at the end of the year when TCAP results and TVASS scores are analyzed. The TCAP results are analyzed at each grade level and the TVASS scores are discussed individually with each teacher.

A summer meeting is held with the Leadership Committee, MYP coordinator, and the parent involvement coordinator to review the data and begin to think of strategies to strengthen each subject or grade.

A newsletter goes home to the parents in August informing the parents of yearly gains, areas for improvement and goals exceeded.

A PowerPoint presentation is done on the school TCAP results during the first PTSO meeting of each school year.

An annual meeting is held in August that informs parents of their rights under Title I and disseminates assessment information.



 

 









Instructional Gap Analysis - Narrative Response Required

“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

  • (12.TIME: MNPS provides each teacher 5 professional days per school year to participate in workshops that teach high quality instructional practices. In addition, other professional development days are given for grant funded or MNPS initiatives. Embedded professional development is provided by the consulting teacher. All teachers hired are highly qualified.
  • MONEY: As GMS did not meet AYP in the subgroup of African American students in math and reading in 2009/2010 professional development for these discipline teachers was a priority. The use of technology to support instructional strategies is also a priority.
  • PERSONNEL: The consulting teacher is providing instructional support. A .5 time general school assistant was purchased with Title I dollars to assist in student attendance issues.
  • OTHER RESOURCES: GMS has three computer labs that are used for student research and testing. In the past three years GMS has spent over $30,000 in the media center to update student and professional development books, magazines, research areas, equipment, and created a reading area for the students.


“What Ought to Be”

  • TIME: GMS believes that the opportunities offered by MNPS and the school provide sufficient time for the acquisition of high quality instructional practices. However, additional time before the students arrive for the school year to analyze data and prepare personalized learning profiles would allow teachers to immediately focus on the areas of greatest need in terms of mastery of objectives. #2, 3, 4


  • MONEY: GMS needs to purchase technology equipment that will allow instructional strategies to be implemented in the most expedient and cost effective manner. Such equipment consists of digital projectors, ELMOs, and interactive boards. In addition, GMS would benefit from having the district technology personnel conduct training sessions after school to ensure that the instructional staff is comfortable and knowledgeable in the use of the equipment. Due to conflicts with the Purchasing Department and Title I, GMS has not received approximately $17,000 of requisitioned technology. GMS was not informed that the order was cancelled and had the funds available from the Title account. GMS believes this should be restored.


  • PERSONNEL: GMS would benefit with one additional certified teacher to lower the

student/teacher ratio in grades 7 and 8.GMS would also benefit with one additional

special education teacher to lower the student/teacher ratio and implement full

inclusion

  • OTHER RESOURCES: Discovery Education needs to be continued to assist teachers in the assessing their students.




Equity and Adequacy:



Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

All teachers have the opportunity to use five paid professional days to acquire training in high quality instructional practices.. The weekly team meetings allow staff to bring up concerns and strategize methods for addressing these concerns. All staff meet so that everyone has a safe environment in which to ask for assistance. The team atmosphere ensures that all stakeholders are important for success and thus, ensures the support of the entire team.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

GMS realizes that our math scores must continue to improve at the rate that occurred between 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Training for all math teachers and money for math supplies have been a priority for the 06/07 school year. Springboard training has occurred for all math teachers, ETA math manipulative training has been offered both at the district and site level, and additional math workshops are periodically provided at the district level.

Based on the data, are we currently meeting the needs of all students in our school?

Although GMS has shown growth in all subgroups from 2009/2010 to 2010 to 2011, there are areas of greater students showing nonproficiency in the mastery of objectives in both math and reading. These subgroups are African American students and Free and Reduced Lunch students (economically disadvantaged).

12).




Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

To obtain our gains teachers met in grade level teams to discuss the above issues pertaining to the team. The teams met on a weekly basis. In addition, mentors were assigned to new teachers to assist in ensuring that good communication is occurring among all of the staff and that the needs of the new teachers are recognized. All of the teachers are encouraged to share new and effective strategies with their teams. In addition, reading teachers across grade levels support reading initiatives by having 7th and 8th grade students read with 5th and 6th grade students. Teachers shared their current lesson plans to ensure that all students receive the best practices that the team can provide. These lesson plans were also shared with the media specialist and the peer instructor so that those individuals could pull together supportive materials for the classes. Although GMS did not meet benchmarks for the African American subgroups in math and reading in 09/10, the same strategies were employed. GMS did show growth in all subgroups from 09/10 to 10/11 and believe the growth was due to continued staff interactions in a collegial environment. Our fifth and eighth grade writing scores showed great growth and GMS attributes this to a greater focus on writing both in those reading/language arts classes and across the curriculum.



Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major challenges and how do we know



GMS believes that our major instructional challenges are as follows:

1. Protecting planning time.

2. Ensuring smaller class size.

3. Ensuring that new teachers understand how to fully utilize test data results

4. Ensuring that absent teachers are replaced with quality substitutes.

5. Lack of training in the effective use of technology in the classroom to support instruction.

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

How will we address our challenges?



GMS will continue to provide opportunities for math teachers to acquire instruction in high quality practices on-site using math specialists, in workshops chosen specifically to strengthen specific math and technology areas if funding allows. In addition, the special education department will continue to be evaluated to ensure that the educators strongest in math instructional qualities will teach the majority of our students with disabilities. Available dollars will also be allocated for the extended learning opportunities program when available. All available assessment tools will be utilized and analyzed to ensure that necessary interventions are administered in a timely manner (Discovery Education, IXL, Apangea, myON, and classroom-generated assessments).



MNPS is providing a pilot program for the integration of social studies units with literacy instruction in a fifth grade classroom and an eighth grade classroom. In addition, MNPS is providing Princeton Review materials for teachers to use in the seventh and eighth grade for interventions to support teacher instruction.

Dr. Moore continues to recruit highly qualified teachers by providing an environment that provides staff support by: providing team mentors, interviewing and asking teachers what their teaching strategies are (interactive, rather than stand and deliver), and soliciting recommendations from other staff members on potential highly qualified staff that they may know from college classes or other environments.

14.

 


































































































Curriculum Gap Analysis - Narrative Response Required

“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality curricular practices?)

Goodlettsville Middle School currently uses the following resources to achieve our social and academic goals:

TIME: 1. Teachers meet weekly on grade level to share high quality curricular practices.

12) 2. After school workshops on the use of technology equipment available in the school, differentiated instruction, co-teaching and other various workshops are offered. Some days are devoted to Professional Learning Community development. Opportunities for training in IB, Exceptional Education best practices, English Language Learner best practices, Kagan strategies, Unwrapping the Standards and COMP (classroom management)

3. Books and CDs on high quality curricular and classroom management practices are purchased and assigned to teachers to read/use at home.

4. Planning days are scheduled by the district for teachers to plan for the implementation of high quality curricular practices.

5. The consulting teacher is used to coordinate team level meetings so that teachers make the decisions, assessments, and ideas surrounding the School Improvement Plan, but are not bogged down by the time needed for the coordination.

6. GMS is developing a professional learning community to discuss current trends and practices in education.



MONEY

1 Skillstutor, a computer intervention program was used for three years. The cost for four (4) years was approximately $13,000.00 and was implemented the spring of 2007. It is not longer used due to lack of funding. We now use myOn Reader, a web-based reading program, IXL, a web-based math supplement, and Apangea, also a web-based math supplement. We require the funds to keep these supports in place.

PERSONNEL:



1. A consulting teacher has been hired to assist with ensuring that high quality curricular practices are encouraged.

12) 2.The administration has used Title I funds to hire a consulting teacher to support classroom instruction, encourage parental support, assist teachers in analyzing data. An ESEA Program Specialist, working on a stipend, establishes extended learning opportunity programs and is responsible for the Title I compliance issues.

3. The school counseling department consists of two school counselors and one full time guidance clerk. MNPS hires a psychologist who reviews all exceptional education issues. Various agencies provide additional counseling support services.



OTHER RESOURCES

  1. There are parent volunteers to read to the students, chaperone field trips, and to assist during some science lab with the students. IB students from Hunters Lane assist the fifth grade classes several afternoons a week.

MNPS is providing a pilot program for the integration of social studies units with literacy

instruction in a fifth grade classroom and an eighth grade classroom. In addition, MNPS is

providing Princeton Review materials for teachers to use in the seventh and eighth grade for

interventions to support teacher instruction .

“What Ought to Be”

1. Time should be protected both for individual planning times and for departmental meetings. Additional planning days are needed to complete personalized learning plans based on all available data. With the new data warehouse this should facilitate the work.



MONEY:

1. COACH materials were purchased for our exceptional education students in math and reading/language arts. COACH materials were also purchased for all regular education students in math and language arts/reading. The total cost for all teachers to have one class set was approximately $7,600. GMS desires all teachers to use these tools effectively.

2. Funding needs to be increased to include that ability to purchase intervention and supplemental programs currently in place, opportunities for tutoring both after school and during school hours, the ability to purchase a full time attendance clerk, provide professional development on site, and pay teachers to come to school early to develop individual learning plans for all students.

3. Funds to purchase new and upgrade old technology needs to be available.



PERSONNEL:



1. GMS would benefit from a MNPS funded secretary/clerk. This position is needed for entering school data and monitoring student attendance.

2. GMS would benefit with two additional certified teachers to be able to fully implement inclusion and to maintain common grade level planning times.

3. GMS would benefit with one additional exceptional education teacher to lower the student/teacher ratio and to fully implement total inclusion.

4. GMS would benefit from a cadre of highly qualified substitute teachers that are assigned to the schools on a daily basis. With the numerous professional development required trainings and other unforeseen teacher absences, classroom instruction is suffering from a lack of dependable and qualified substitute teachers. The substitute teachers can serve as tutors for below proficient students when they are not needed to substitute.

5. GMS believes that the school made gains in 2010/2011 due to three tutors assisting classroom teachers to provide additional support to struggling students. GMS needs at least two tutors to be able to continue making our gains.

OTHER RESOURCES:

1. GMS would benefit from a new HVAS system. Currently the classrooms have window a/c units which are extremely loud the students cannot hear the teacher while instruction is being given. (approximate cost, $85,000)

2. GMS needs acoustical tiles in the 7th and 8th grade classrooms and hallways to minimize the noise.

 


 

Template 3.1.c: Curricular Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.2)

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Goodlettsville Middle School’s strengths are a consistent core of teachers who have provided consistency in instructional practices. The current administrations six year term has provided additional support in the implementation of best practices strategies.

MNPS provides almost unlimited opportunities for instructional support as evidenced by the ERO system of workshop opportunities and embedded professional development via the consulting teacher.

The district’s support for the continued development of a standards document and pacing guide is an important strength. This document provides complete guidance to ensure that all of the standards for a particular grade and discipline are taught. It provides both experienced and novice teachers with the same guidance for teaching the objectives that need to be mastered. The Pathway to College grant provided training and materials for the support of the science curriculum. The “Hands-On-Science” workshops have been completed by our 5th and 6th grade teachers. Other MNPS grants support the social studies curriculum. The Teaching of American History grant trained GMS teachers to use primary sources, various texts presented in a narrative form, and the State History Museum to assist students in the mastery of social studies objectives. Two GMS teachers have completed the social studies grant. GMS has obtained official status as a Middle Years Programme school, which is a feeder school to the Hunters Lane International Baccalaureate Programme.

#Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

Our major challenges are to continue to increase our level of reading achievement and math achievement levels to continue to meet NCLB benchmarks. The protection of teacher planning time continues to be a challenge. The new teacher evaluation system presents challenges for both teachers and the administration. Teachers feel discouraged not obtaining the highest levels of achievement in the scoring process. Administration finds it challenging to continue to complete all of the previous admin duties, and now complete the increased evaluation schedule.

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

How will we address our challenges?

GMS will continue to work with the MNPS staff to develop a curriculum support team that focuses on the unique GMS school/academic environment and that can react (as a team) immediately to adjust or correct needed curriculum issues to ensure instruction tailored for diversified learners.



MNPS is providing a pilot program for the integration of social studies units with literacy instruction in a fifth grade classroom and an eighth grade classroom. In addition, MNPS is providing Princeton Review materials for teachers to use in the seventh and eighth grade for interventions to support teacher instruction.

 

##SIP Leadership Team Member Name

Leader-ship Chair? (Y/N)

Position

Name of Subcommittee(s) (when applicable)

Dr. Sarah Moore

Yes

Principal

Action Plan Development Component 4

Richard Jones

Yes

Assistant Principal

Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis, Component 1b

Ashlie Jackson

No

8th Grade Team Leader

Component 1 and 3

D. Ashley Oliver

No

Sixth Grade Teacher

Component 2 and 3

Alison Rager

No

MYP coordinator

Component 3 and 4

Lindsay Habedank

No

5th Grade Team Leader

Component 5

Tonya Stamps

No

Head Custodian

Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis, Component 1

Pam McMullen

No

Parent

Action Plan Development

Judy Atkins

No

Community President, Regions Bank, Goodlettsville Branch

School Profile and Collaborative Process, Component 1

Nasheba Pritchett

No

School counselor

School Counselor

Robyn Daniels

No

School Counselor

School Counselor

Alison Maliszewski

No

Media Specialist

Component 4

Ruth Gurich

No

Consulting Teacher

Coordinator

 

 

 

 

Component 1a – School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.2: Subcommittee Formation and Operation

(Rubric Indicator 1.2)

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 1 School Profile and Collaborative Process

 

 

Member Name

Position

Chair

Kris Clements

Related Arts Team Leader

x

Jeffrey Clark

Art Teacher

 

Tony Dorris

Computer Teacher

 

Shelly Lott

Physical Education

 

Jessie Sheran

Spanish

 

Angel Brown

Exceptional Education

Team Leader

 

 

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

Component 1 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

 

Subcommittee 1 Chair Signature

 

 

 

 


 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 2 Beliefs, Mission and Vision

 

 

 

 

 

Member Name

Position

Chair

 

 

 

Krista Morris

6th Grade Team Leader

X

 

 

 

Sam Banks

Science Teacher

 

 

 

 

Kenlyn Seard

Science Teacher

 

 

 

 

Shea Hartman

Math Teacher



 

 

 

 

Melissa Zettler

Math Teacher

 

 

 

 

D. Ashley Oliver

Reading/language arts Teacher

 

 

 

 

Component 2 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee 2 Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 3 Curricular, Instructional, Assessment, and Organizational Effectiveness

 

 

Member Name

Position

Chair

Ashlie Jackson

8th Grade Team Leader

x

David Brooks

8th Grade Math Teacher

 

Tiffany Morrow

7th/8th Grade Reading and Language Teacher

 

Sarah Carr

7th/8th Grade Reading and Language Teacher

 

Mahagony Vaughn

7/8th Grade Exceptional Education

Teacher

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Component 3 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

______________________________________________________________________

Subcommittee 3 Co-Chair Signature

 

 

Subcommittee 3 Co- Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 4 Action Plan Development

 

 

Member Name

Position

Chair

Brent Kellems

7th Grade Team Leader

X

Brandy Stamper

7th and 8th Grade Reading and Language Teacher

 

Alison Rager

IB Coordinator

 

Ruth Gurich

Consulting Teacher

 

Alison Maliszewski

Media Consultant

 

Dawn Hickman

Exceptional Education Teacher

 

 

 

Component 4 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

 

Subcommittee 4 Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 5 The School Improvement Plan and Process Evaluation

 

 

Member Name

Position

Chair

Dustin White

5th Grade Team Leader

X

Misty Palmer

5th Grade Teacher

 

Lindsay Habedank

5th Grade Teacher

 

Kenneth Stephens

5th Grade Teacher

 

Morgan Low

5th Grade Teacher

 

Angel Brown

5th Grade Exceptional Education Team Leader

 

 

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

Component 5 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

 

Subcommittee 5 Chair Signature

 

 

 


 

Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.3 Collection of Academic and Nonacademic Data and Analysis/Synthesis

TEMPLATE 1.3.1: Data Sources (including surveys)

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Data Source

Relevant Findings

1) GMS conducts a parent survey twice yearly asking all parents to make recommendations for any changes that will enhance the academic and social environment of the school and to make changes and improvements Parent/School Compact and the Parent Involvement Policy. In addition, GMS also conducts various student surveys to solicit input from all stakeholders on their perspective concerning safety and academic strategy issues. Some of the recommendations implemented were:

15. 1.

 

From solicited donations for “beautification,” the Goodlettsville Alumni Association gave plants which were placed at entrances and various hallways of the school. The outside of the school was also re-landscaped by Gardner Landscaping Company.

All teachers are now required to be at a posted duty in the mornings and afternoons to ensure that students may only walk in one direction and at specific times. This has given the students a general routine to follow.

Buses are no longer allowed to drop students off before 8:20 am and. students are not allowed in the building until 8:30 a.m. This ensures that proper monitoring is in place.

* Parents complained about the coke machines in the building and these were removed.

* Parents asked for more information to be posted on the web and this was done in 2010/2011 and continuing in 2011/2012.

The cafeteria has also eliminated much of the sugar laden products that parents did not want.

Fifth and sixth graders have all been housed in one area of the school so that they are not exposed to the older students.

Tutoring was again offered at the parents’ requests. In 2009/2010 GMS began tutoring in January 2010 before school and after school. Tutoring occurred on Tuesdays and Wednesdays through April 2010. The same schedule was used in 2010/2011. There will be no before school or after school tutoring in 2011/2012 until funding is secured.

Campus supervisors escort students to their destination when they need to leave class during class time.

Teachers will continue to be trained to develop their own web pages so

parents will know what is occurring in the classrooms.

 

1)Survey of all students, including transitional students for any reason(including homeless, displaced, migratory, etc.) of desired changes, feelings of safety, and their academic achievement in relation to TCAP content standards, etc.

Students wanted more pep rallies and dances. GMS teachers organized academic incentive activities on a more consistent basis in 09/10. In 2010/2011 a Schoolwide Positive Behavior Plan was implemented. This plan will be continued in 2011/2012 and the SWPBS Task Force will work to continue to provide positive activities for GMS students.

15.Volunteer Survey

Parents would like to volunteer but work and time are challenges. Parents who do volunteer have a limited amount of time. A list of approximately 10 parents was compiled during the school year of 2009/2010. In 2010/2011 GMS worked at expanding the parents’ email lists to add another layer for communication. More parent names were added in 2011/2012 after the Annual Meeting.

School-wide or targeted use of Title I funds survey

100% of the parents and the staff surveyed voted for a school-wide use of Title I dollars.

Mobility Rate

The 48.1% mobility rate creates challenges to a consistent approach to instruction at GMS. The mobility rate has been in the 40+ range for the past three years and GMS realizes that “connections” are difficult to create when consistency does not exist. 2011/2012 mobility rate has not been confirmed as of October 2010, however, the Leadership team believes the rate to be comparable.

Attendance Rate

Attendance at GMS has always been consistently positive. However, a slight drop in 2010/2011 has made staff aware that attention to attendance rates must also be a focus. The attendance figure for the past several years remains a concern.

 

TEMPLATE 1.3.2: School and Community Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Narrative and analysis of relevant school and community factors:

The GMS student population is much more diverse than the Goodlettsville community.

 

*I. Student Characteristics

 

a.The current enrollment at GMS is 480 students.

 

b.The ethnicity breakdown is as shown below. There are:

  • 209 African American students
  • 55 Hispanic students
  • 19 Asian students
  • 197 Caucasian students
  • 0 American Indian student
  • 1 Nat. Haw.

c. We did not have an ELL Population in 2010/2011 but do have 8 students who meet the requirements for this subgroup in 2011/2012.

d. 81.6% of the student population was on free and/or reduced lunch in 2009/2010. In 2011/2012 80 % of GMS students are on free and/or reduced lunch.

e. GMS teachers are all 100% credentialed and highly qualified in their current teaching

areas.

f. The attendance rate for 2010/2011 was 91.8%.

g. GMS had 98 incidents of out of school suspensions in 2009/2010. This number was

reduced from 296 the previous year which we attribute to consistency in our

administrative team (this is their sixth year at GMS).

h. The promotion rate for GMS in 2010/2011 99.4%.

* see attached addendum

*II. GMS Staff Characteristics:

GMS has one principal

One assistant principal

Two school counselors

One .5 guidance clerk

One .5 Title I ESEA clerk

One school secretary/clerk

One secretary/bookkeeper

Thirty-One certified classroom teachers

Two exceptional education paraprofessional

Six cafeteria staff

One campus supervisors

One school resource officer

One media specialist

One media specialist assistant

One part time ESEA Program Specialist on stipend

* One Full-Time Tutor

One in-school suspension monitor

One part-time STARS counselor

One Title I funded Consulting teacher

GMS Faculty demographics are broken down as follows:

  • 75% Female
  • 25% Male
  • 75% Caucasian
  • 25% African American
  • 14% Have less than 4 years of teaching experience
  • 57% 4-9 years of teaching experience
  • 15 % 10-20 years of teaching experience
  • 14 % With more than 20 years experience

Approximately 33% of the faculty have a Masters, Masters Plus Thirty, or Doctorate. This includes teachers who are currently attending a post-graduate program.

 

III. School Characteristics

Aa a & b. Historical Data and Physical Data

Goodlettsville Middle School was first established as a high school in 1917. An elementary school was later established along side of the high school. In 1936 a new elementary school was built. In 1937 a new gymnasium and cafeteria were built for the high school. In 1945 a new high school designed to accommodate 300 students was built at the same location. In 2005 the old, small gymnasium was converted into three new classrooms to house the growing student population. In addition, four mobile units were brought to the school. The guidance office was expanded. In the fall of 2007 three science classrooms were remodeled and the gym floor replaced.

In 1986, the 9th through 12th grade students were moved to Hunters Lane Comprehensive High School. Goodlettsville High School became Goodlettsville Middle School with the remaining 7th and 8th grade students. In the fall of 1999, 5th and 6th grade students were added to the middle school.

The majority of our students come to GMS from Old Center, Gateway Elementary and Goodlettsville Elementary schools.

c. Environmental and Safety conditions:

New fire alarm, security, and phone systems were installed in 2006/2007 to increase the safety of our students and faculty. GMS has an approved safety plan for emergency situations. These plans are reviewed at least twice a year with the staff. GMS staff also includes the emergency plans and routes in their substitute folders so that even if they are absent, the plan is in place.

Three new science labs were created out of existing classrooms, thus increasing the safety of our students while conducting hands-on science activities. The floor of the gymnasium was replaced to ensure the safety of the students during athletic events and physical education classes.

e. & f. School Day and Year Length:

The regular school year consists of 200 contracted days for teachers, with 190 days of instruction. Teachers have a 7.5 hour workday, which includes 55 minutes of planning time for all teachers. The day is divided into seven periods. Math and reading language arts classes have scheduled in blocks.

g. Operating Budget:

The operating budget for the school is set by the Metropolitan Nashville Public System. Financial resources available to support education at GMS include School Board allocated funds, band fund raising efforts, business and private donations, the Title I Program, and BEP 2.0 funds.

Goodlettsville Middle became eligible for Title I funding in 2002/2003. The funding that Title I provides has been used to decrease student/teacher ratio, tutoring, staff development, parent involvement activities, technology acquisitions, and classroom materials and supplies.

h. Per-Pupil Expenditures:

Metro Davidson County provides a $50.00 per child operating budget for the 2007/2008 school year.

 

 

2) and 3) j. & k. & l. Curriculum Offerings and Unique Programs:

GMS is a Middle Years Programme school which feeds into the Hunters Lane High School International Baccalaureate Programme. Students in the 8th grade may also receive high school credit in algebra I, physical science, and Spanish. In addition, students in the 7th grade may receive high school credit in algebra I. Our related arts program provides opportunities for growth in computer education, art, physical education, and band.

Our 5th graders are taught 7) the D.A.R.E. program by our school resource officer. Our 6th graders are taught the G.R.E.A.T program by the same officer. Our school counselor presents Safe At Last, character education, and bullying programs to the students as time allows. The programs are also presented (in a shorter form) to our parents yearly as part of one of our family activity nights. GMS also has a MIP Fragile class. In addition GMS also coordinates federal, state, and local services and programs by:

Federal: Federal ESEA consultant, receipt of Title I, IV dollars 7.

State: Standards awareness training, webinars

District: Cluster support, Parent/family liaisons, district training on new

standards for every teacher, technology training and assist for schools

Local: the Lions club gives GMS students free eye screenings.

Corner stone Counseling provides needy students assistance with emotional and family problems.

7. and 19

Tutoring included morning assistance in reading and math on Tuesday and Wednesday 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. and an afternoon tutoring program which focused on math and reading during the 2010/2011 school year. In addition, our 5th and 6th grade science teachers have been trained in “Hands-on Science” workshops. All of our reading teachers have also been trained in the Comprehensive Literacy program established by the district.

Parents have been surveyed to determine what professional development subjects would most benefit their family. The subjects parents wanted information on were motivation, improved communications with their child, and how to teach them self-discipline. Videos and books are available from the Parent Room (which has been moved to the counseling office due to a flood in room 48 for assistance with these topics. 15.

16.

The school counseling program not only coordinates the transition from our elementary feeders schools for the fourth graders to the fifth grade, they also provide high school, college, and career guidance, awareness, and counseling in a variety of ways. By using an on-line program called Kuder Career Planning the students begin in the seventh grade to inventory their interests, personality traits, and skill levels. Using this program the students then do career searches to further investigate viable options for their future. The students continue this program through their eighth grade year. The counselor then works individually with each eighth grade student to develop a four year plan that will guide them through their high school curriculum, based on the results of the Kuder information. An additional assessment was given to the eighth grade students in an effort to strengthen their opportunities to attend AP classes in high school and thus, college. This assessment, ENCORE, also focused on student interests and skill levels.

 

m. Parental Support:

15) Parent/Teacher Meetings are usually held the last Monday of each school month. In 2006/2007, Dr. Moore requested permission to use Title I dollars to pay a ESEA Program Specialist a stipend to work on developing stronger parent involvement. The ESEA Program Specialist for the year 2010/2011 will worked with compliance issues and requisitioning. A Parent Involvement committee was organized to work closely with the parent volunteers and the MYP coordinator and the Leadership Team to plan the calendar for the year. The program allows for parent volunteers to do work at their home or their workplace, thus allowing working parents, or parent without transportation to participate in their child’s education.

In addition, parents are invited to attend special meetings for the purpose of training parents on the interpretation of their child’s Discovery Education and TCAP scores. 9

If parents have concerns over specific issues, the ESEA Program Specialist lends videos and books to the parent that assists the parent in dealing with the particular problem/issue they are having. A check-out list is kept in the Parent Room. In addition, morning meetings for parents titled “Coffee With the Principal” provide parents with an opportunity to discuss areas of concern or learn about the various activities in which their children may be involved.

19)n. School-business Partnerships:

Office Max, B and T Landscaping, Home Depot, Office Depot, Publix, Kroger, Cornerstone Financial, Target, Lone Oak Farms, Dr. James Bush, Senator Joe Haynes, Exxon, an Eastern Star chapter, Regions Bank, Shoney’s, Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Papa John’s Pizza and other anonymous alumni and private individuals donate materials and resources to the school to support its function.

*IV. Parent/Guardian Demographics

GMS serves a diverse community of stakeholders. Our student ethnicity breakdown at the beginning of 2011/2012 was as follows:

American Indian or Alaska Nuit 0%

Asian 3.95%

African American 43.45%

Hispanic or Latino 11.43%

Caucasian 40.96%

The percentage of our students who speak English is 97.25 %, thus indicating that most of our parents are from this country. Only 9 students speak Spanish as their first language, thus indicating that our Hispanic/Latino population of parents is very small….approximately t families. These students must be fluent in English to attend GMS.

The percentage of parents with a high school degree or less is 50.8%. Twenty-nine percent have some college, up to Associates Degrees; and twenty percent have more than an Associates Degree.

Family Count:

  • Married Couple family with children under 18 1,202
  • Male with no wife present 124
  • Female householder with no husband present 765

Household Income:

 

· $100,000+ 9.0%0-$19,999 21.5%

· $20,000-$29,999 14.0%

· $30,000-$39,999 15.5%

· $40,000-59,999 18.0%

· 60,000-$99,999 22.0%

 

V. Community Characteristics

According to the Goodlettsville Chamber of Commerce, the 2008 projected demographics of Goodlettsville 5 miles from the intersection of Long Hollow Pike and Dickerson Road is as follows:

Ethnicity:

80.85 % Caucasian

13.35 % African American

1.09 % Asian

0.33 % American Indian

4.38 % Hispanic

Economically:

· $52,014 Average household income

· 10.7 % Households earn less than $20,000

Goodlettsville is located in both Davidson and Sumner. Families that live in Davidson County are served by the school.

Some of the significant companies located in Goodlettsville are Regions Bank, Dollar General headquarters, IBP meat packing, Fleming Food Distribution Inc., Tyson Foods and G.F. Puhl Company, Inc., a sheet metal business.

Component 1b – Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis/Synthesis

TEMPLATE 1.4: Variety of Academic and Non-Academic Assessment Measures

(Rubric Indicator 1.4)

List Data Sources

Tennessee Comprehensive Achievement Program Report

TCAP Writing Assessment for grades 5 and 8

Metropolitan Nashville Reading Assessments ( BASI)

Metropolitan Nashville District Writing Assessments and Tennessee State Writing Assessments

Discovery Education Predictive Assessments

Student’s Individual Education Plans

Physical Science ( For High School Credit, 8th Grade)End of Course Exam

Spanish I (For High School Credit, 8th Grade) End of Course Exam

Unit and teacher made tests

Nine week tests

7th and 8th grade semester exams

School suspensions

Attendance rates

Mobility rates

Free and reduced lunch data

Teacher/Staff /Student surveys

Report card letter grade distribution

State Report Card

Encore

 

TEMPLATE 1.5: Data Collection and Analysis

 

Describe the data collection and analysis process used in determining your strengths and needs.

Non-Academic Data

The non-academic data is used in a variety of ways. The teacher, staff/student surveys were used to receive recommendations for the following school year. The fifth grade teachers requested that their classes be self-contained. These recommendations were done and reflected in the 2011-2012 master schedule. Some other non-academic measures are school suspensions, attendance rates, mobility rates, and free and reduced lunch data. School suspensions and attendance are monitored monthly. GMS principals meet with parents and students who are suspended or truant. The attendance rate is also monitored by the attendance worker to alert the MNPS attendance officer. The high mobility rate gives GMS an indication of a need to test newly enrolled students. New students are no longer tested in the BRI. The free and reduced lunch data helps define our economically disadvantaged students. This data is used to determine the amount of Title I funding that GMS receives.

For the past years, GMS has collected data to determine our strengths and needs from all of the sources listed in the previous section 1.4. The TCAP information is analyzed as soon as GMS tests the students using the Discovery Education Assessment, a predictive assessment for the TCAP test. GMS teachers plot the test results on a “level of proficiency” form that identifies each student in the school as below basic, basic, proficient, and advanced. Each teacher is given the complete assessment, broken down into mastery of specific performance indicators in math and reading/language arts. Each student’s performance is evaluated and a plan is developed and reviewed in weekly team meetings tailored to the objectives that need to be taught. The DEA is a predictive, whole year assessment. As the state has changed the standards, predictive testing proficiency scores have been adjusted. In 10/11 the combination of all assessment instruments was compiled on an Excel spread sheet. However, in 10/11 MNPS’s Data Warehouse provided all of this data in one place for teacher review. At the start of each school year, the Basic Reading Inventory test was administered by the reading teachers and student’s reading levels were determined. This has been discontinued but last year’s scores are reviewed on the students who remain at GMS this year. Reading teachers have tested their students on the MyOn Reader electronic library to determine their lexile levels for use in choosing reading books from the library. Reading classes are then conducted according to a comprehensive reading workshop program established by current brain researched strategies. However, 2011/2012 reading classes will move to an integrated literacy model. Math teachers are implemented a balanced math program in all classes which includes continuous informal assessments and formal assessments. Exceptional education students IEPs are monitored by regular and exceptional education teachers to ensure those students receive the proper classes according to their abilities. An inclusion model for students has been established. The formal TCAP Writing Assessment is done by grades 5 and 8. For the past two years, all grade levels were given weekly prompts. In 10/11 prompts were given “officially” three times before the formal test prompt. This gives extra practice to all students. The writing assessment is used to track our students’ writing proficiency. The writing assessment is used to track our students’ writing process and organizational skills to prepare them for the formal TCAP Writing Assessment. Teachers of each grade level are actively involved in using the data to help identify students for before/afternoon tutoring (when funding allows), pullout groups, and specific computer-based curriculum for remediation. The Data Warehouse provides a thorough compilation of a student’s scores and important information to assist teachers to understand the student’s entire academic and social picture. Initially, the only data available was the TCAP scores. Non-academic data is used to assist teachers to focus on any challenges their students may have with illness, attendance, or discipline issues. Physical science and Spanish I assessments are used to encourage students to tackle rigorous classes in preparation for high school. The report card letter grade distribution and the State Report Card results are used in assisting all committees to continue to monitor our School Improvement Plan’s effectiveness. In addition, as these tools are public documents, GMS uses them from parent information workshops conducted during our PTSO and family activity night meetings. 19 and 17

 



TEMPLATE 1.6: Report Card Data Disaggregation

(Rubric Indicator 1.6)

Report Card Data Disaggregation

 

*The following data disaggregation analysis was used to establish GMS’s student’s priorities for academic performance in respect to:

Reading Needs: The benchmark the State of Tennessee required for the attainment of AYP in the 2010/2011 school year was 49%.

 

Race:

Goodlettsville Middle School historically has had less than 45 students in the Hispanic, Native American and the Asia/PacificIslander subgroups.

Asian: GMS did not have a subgroup of 45 students in 2009/2010 or in 2010/2011. However, the 2009/2010 percentage of proficient and advanced was 19% and in 2010/2011 47.8%

American Indian: GMS had no students in this subgroup for either year.

African American: In 09/10 the percentage of African American students scoring proficient and advanced in the TCAP tests for reading/language was 23%. In 2010/2011 the percentage of African American students scoring proficient and advanced in reading/language was 31.3%. This showed a growth of 8.3%.

White: The percentage of Caucasian students scoring proficient and advanced in the TCAP tests for reading/language arts was 54.6%. This score is significantly higher than the 09/10 score of 44.9%.

All: The 10/11 data reflects GMS students attaining an overall reading score of 41.1%. The 2009/2010 percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced was 31.6% showing a gain of 9.5%.

Hispanic: The 10/11 data reflects GMS Hispanic students attaining an overall reading score of 30.9% proficient and advanced. The subgroup has less than 45 students in it in 2009/2010. However, it does show an increase in proficient/advanced of 2%.

Economically Disadvantaged: The 10/11 data reflects ED students attaining an overall score of 37.6% proficient and advanced. In 2009/2010 the percentage of Educationally Disadvantaged students scoring proficient and advanced was 26.2% showing an increase of 11.4%.

Students With Disabilities: The 2009/2010 data reflects SWD students attaining an overall score of 23.8% proficient and advanced. In 2010/2011 students in this subgroup attained a score of 57.1% proficient and advanced showing a gain of33.3%.

Gender: In 2009/2010 36.1% of GMS female students scored proficient and advanced in reading. In 2010/2011 46.4% of GMS female students scored proficient or advanced in reading showing a 10.3% gain. 27.3% of males scored proficient or advanced in 2009/2010. This was raised to 36.1% in 2010/2011 showing a gain of8.8%



Math Needs: The benchmark the State of Tennessee required for the attainment of AYP in the 2010/2011 school year was 40%

For 2009/2010 the disaggregated data by race for math scores is as follows:

Asian: GMS did not have a subgroup of 45 students in 2009/2010 or in 2010/2011. However, the 2009/2010 percentage of proficient and advanced in math was 52.4% and in 2010/2011 60.9%

American Indian: GMS had no students in this subgroup for either year.

Hispanic:In 2009/2010 the number of Hispanic students was just under 45. In 2010/2011 GMS anticipated our Hispanic population to be above 45. Their 09/10 scores in math showed 14.3% proficient or advanced. In 2010/2011 those scores were raised to 33.3% proficient and advanced.

White: 25.6% of this subgroup scored proficient and advanced in 2009/2010 and 36.8% in 2010/2011 showing a gain of 11.2%

African American: 12.8% of this subgroup scored proficient and advanced in 2009/2010 and 27.1% in 2010/2011 showing a gain of14.3%.

All: The 09/10 data reflects GMS students attaining an overall math score of 19.9% meeting the Tennessee State benchmark in all subgroups except the subgroup of African American students. In 2010/2011 GMS students attained an overall math score of 33.3% showing a gain of13.4%.

Economically Disadvantaged: In 2009/2010 students in the ED subgroup attained a score of 16.3% proficient and advanced. In 2010/2011 students in the ED subgroup attained a score of 31.3% showing a gain of 15%.

Exceptional Education: In 2009/2010 student in the Exceptional Educational subgroup scored 23.8% proficient and advanced. This score increased to 50% in 2010/2011.

ELL: In 2009/2010 ELL students scored 14.3% in math, although there were not 45 students enrolled at GMS that year. In 2010/2011 ELL students scored 26.7%. This year also revealed less than 45 students enrolled in the subgroup.

Gender: In 2009/2010 female students attained a proficient and advanced percentage of 21.3% in the math portion of the TCAP. In 2010/2011 female students attained a proficient and advanced score of 30% showing a gain of 8.7%. 18.5% of GMS males were proficient or advanced in 2009/2010 and in 2010/2011 that rose to 36.5%. This showed a gain of 18%.

Proficiency level disaggregation:

 

Growth differences between high, middle, and low achievers



2009/2010

2011/2012



Math

6

9.2

Advanced



13.9

24.1

Proficient



42.7

43

Basic



37.4

23.7

Below Basic

Students showed a gain of 3.2% in students scoring advanced in the math part of the TCAP from 2009/2010 to 21011/2012. Students showed a gain of 10.2% in students scoring proficient in the math part of the TCAP from 2009/2012 to 2010/2011. .3% more of GMS students scored basic during the same time period and our below basic students dropped by 13.7%.



Reading/ Language Arts

2009/2010

2011/2012





2.1

6.5

Advanced



29.5

34.6

Proficient



50.9

46.3

Basic



17.5

12.6

Below Basic



Students showed a gain of 4.4% in students scoring advanced in the reading/language arts part of the TCAP from 2009/2010 to 2011/2012. Student showed a gain of 5.1% in students scoring proficient in the reading /language arts portion of the TCAP from 2009/2010 to 2010/2011. Students scoring basic dropped by 4.6% and students scoring below basic dropped by 4.9% during the same time period.

.

The obvious conclusion to the interpretation of this data is to continue to focus on the growth of our reading and language arts discipline and to increase our endeavors to reach NCLB benchmarks in math in all of our subgroups especially our African American students. We need to intensify our efforts to improve our math instructional strategies in our exceptional education department and continue to encourage development of best practices strategies in all disciplines. GMS is also aware that our regular education teachers need a significant amount of training in the teaching of LEP students and our ever increasing population of Hispanic students. Our Hispanic subgroup showed the least amount of growth in proficient and advanced, and the least amount in the reduction of our basic and below basic. 5 and 6



 

TEMPLATE 1.7: Narrative Synthesis of All Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.7)

*Narrative Synthesis of Data



The subcommittee for Component I analyzed the various data available for past years and compared it to current data provided by the 09/10 data reflecting the new state standards. Targets were established for each of the NCLB subgroups.

The spring 2009 TCAP was used to assess students in the fall of 2009/2010. 09/10 data did not return in time for staff to use this in placing students in classes and reviewing student scores before the beginning of the 10/11 school year. Older AYP data on students was used to provide a close review of collected student data about student academic performance. First, the data was analyzed to discover apparent trends in student performance and to establish baselines for improvement. Goodlettsville’s NCLB profile indicates that the school met the proficiency targets in attendance. 2008/2009 TCAP targets for reading/language arts and math at the middle school level were 86% for reading/language arts and 83% for math. GMS missed meeting math AYP goals in 09/10 in the African American subgroup in the math portion of the AYP. This was the only subgroup cell that did not meet the state benchmarks for the 09/10 school year.

 

The number of student taking the reading portion of the 09/10 TCAP assessment was 404. The number of students taking the math portion of the 09/10 TCAP assessment was 404. In 2010/2011 GMS students made significant gains in all subgroups except our Hispanic subgroup which remained relatively even. Some of the gains were made due to our Exceptional Education students taking the MAAS test rather than the regular TCAP. Other gains were made to our intensive tutoring program, supplemental math intervention programs and web-based resources, and our teachers’ increased use of data to drive instruction.

Summary

Critical Areas of Strength



Although GMS missed meeting AYP benchmarks in 2009/2010 by only one subgroup in math, it is recognized that the percentage of students scoring proficient and advanced with the new state standards is not at an acceptable level. GMS did make AYP in 2010/2011. The faculty will continue to move all students toward proficiency in 2011/2012. GMS gains were attributed in part to the extremely strong scores produced by the 5th and 8th grade students in the state writing assessment. 89% of 8th grade students scored proficient and advanced. 86% of 5th grade students scored proficient and advanced.



Historical Areas of Strength:

The Discovery Education scores are analyzed as soon as the results are returned. Teacher instruction is be guided by the results.

GMS recognizes that to meet NCLB requirements additional support in math must be given to all students. Strong teacher teams were developed over the past two years. GMS’s ability to focus on reading needs, objectives mastered, and areas where tutoring needs to occur are all strengths of the program. An increased focus on using IB curriculum and integrated lessons across the curriculum also are developing as strengths.

 

Critical Areas of Need

Historical Areas of Need:

.

5). Title I funds both for math manipulatives and professional development have been funneled to assist in meeting or challenges in math. In addition, GMS administration has changed personnel to that the students have the best possible instructor in math. An intervention using the Voyager Math program was used in 2010/2011. This provided 30 minutes of additional math instruction daily. Professional development was provided by the district for math teachers. This training provided best practice strategies for math teachers and these strategies continue to be implemented. Changes in staffing have also occurred in the rest of the math subgroups. In 2009/2010 inclusion was begun in 5th and 6th grades. While it was also begun in the fall of 2009, it became apparent that GMS needed to begin this program in the 5th and 6th grades and wait until the 7th and 8th grade teachers had time to be trained and time for planning before we totally enacted the inclusion in those grades. Full inclusion has been implemented in 10/11. In 2011/2012 a combination of resource classes and inclusion is occurring in order to best meet the needs of our students.



GMS recognizes that many of our students scored near the cutoff score for proficient. GMS must continue to focus on raising student’s reading levels by using the Middle School Initiative in reading, integrated literacy, tutoring, and continued support for our classroom teachers to use best practice strategies (cooperative learning groups, use of manipulatives, guided reading groups, etc.).Although GMS students met benchmark in reading for 09/10, and AYP in 2010/2011 GMS recognizes that continued efforts for interventions in reading must occur.

GMS students scored only 81.1% proficient in the writing assessment in 08/09. This has been an area of critical need. In 09/10 fifth grade scored 82.7 up from the previous year. Eighth grade students scored 89.4 proficient or advanced. In 2010/2011 fifth grade students scored 86% proficient and 89% proficient in eighth grade. All disciplines are to be using some open-response questions to help students practice writing skills. In addition, all language arts classes are writing to a prompt either weekly, or on a schedule that allows for corrections, editing, and revision by the students. Writing daily in all subject areas is now an expectation.



Each year the principal monitors attendance closely to that a downward trend of student attendance is addressed as it develops. The principal (Dr. Moore) designated a front office clerk to monitor daily attendance. GMS’s high mobility rate presents an additional challenge to ensure that students are identified and tracked for attendance. This decision was made to protect the teacher planning and instructional time. The 2006/2007 attendance rate dropped below 93% mid year. With the concentrated effort of the office staff and the faculty, the yearly attendance rate of 94.1% met NCLB benchmarks. In 2009/2010 Dr. Moore used Stimulus funds to hire a .5 attendance clerk to assist in the maintaining and exceeding of the 93% AYP goal. 2008/2009 TCAP scores were used to assess students in the fall of 2009. Continued review of attendance occurred daily through 10/11 and will through 11/12



A close review of collected student data yielded valuable information about student academic performance. First, the data was analyzed to discover apparent trends in student performance and to establish baselines for improvement. Goodlettsville’s NCLB profile indicates that the school met the proficiency targets in attendance. In addition to the above, by reviewing all available data, GMS concluded that a concerted effort must be made in math to ensure that all subgroups make NCLB benchmarks. . In addition, GMS must continue to provide students in reading and language arts with best practice strategies in the classroom and extended learning opportunities both before and after school. 5

GMS continues to provide interventions for both reading and math to move all students in all subgroups to meet proficiency on the TCAP. Tutoring during the day by a Title I funded tutor in reading, an after school tutoring program, two computer programs purchased to support math instruction, an online library and Templeton and Bear’s Word study are the support systems GMS has chosen to employ.

TEMPLATE 1.8: Prioritized List of Goal Targets

(Rubric Indicator 1.8)

Prioritized List of Goal Targets

The rationale for each of the following goals is to meet NCLB benchmarks:

 

Goal 1:

GMS will increase the percentage of all Math students in all subgroups on the TCAP Assessments by 20% as measured by TCAP scores by June 2012.

· GMS will move all math students from 33.3% proficient and advanced to 40.6% proficient and advanced for safe harbor, OR benchmark at 60%

· GMS will move African American students from 27% proficient and advanced to 34.3% proficient and advanced

· GMS will move our Hispanic subgroup from 34% proficient and advanced to 40.6% proficient and advanced

· GMS will move our White subgroup from 39% proficient and advanced to 45.1% proficient and advanced

· GMS will move our Economically Disadvantaged subgroup from 33% proficient and advanced to 39.7% proficient and advanced

· GMS will move our LEP students from 29% proficient and advanced to 36.1% proficient and advanced.

· GMS will maintain or exceed our SWD subgroup scores of 48% proficient and advanced or meet benchmark of 60%

 

 

Goal 2:

GMS will increase the percentage of all Reading/Language students in all subgroups on the TCAP Assessment by 20% as measured by TCAP scores by 2012.

 

  • GMS students will meet benchmark of 66% proficient and advanced
  • GMS will move African American students from 31.3% proficient and advanced to safe harbor at 38.1% proficient and advanced
  • GMS will move the Hispanic subgroup from 30.9% proficient and advanced to 37.8% proficient and advanced
  • GMS will move our White subgroup from 54.6% proficient and advanced to safe harbor at 59.1benchmark at 66%
  • GMS will move the Economically Disadvantaged subgroup from 37.1% proficient and advanced to safe harbor of 43.3% OR benchmark at 66% proficient and advanced
  • GMS will move our LEP subgroup from 26.7% proficient and advanced to safe harbor at 34% proficient and advanced
  • GMS will move our SWD subgroup from 57.1% proficient and advanced to safe harbor at 61.3% proficient and advanced

 

Goal 3:

GMS will increase the percentage of all Reading/Language & Math scores from students with disabilities on the TCAP Assessment by 20% as measured by TCAP scores by 2012.

 

· GMS will move our SWD from 50% proficient and advanced in math to 55% proficient and advanced by May 2012.

· GMS will move our SWD from 57.1% proficient and advanced in reading /language arts to 61.3% proficient and advanced.

 

Goal 4:



Fifth grade students will move from 86% proficient on the writing prompt to show at least a 10% gain or safe harbor.

Eighth grade students will move from 89% proficient on the writing prompt to show at least a 10% gain or safe harbor.



Goal 5:

GMS will increase the teachers’ perception that “community members support of the teachers that contributes to students’ success.” (TN Tell Survey, Q4.1.g) from 64% to Davidson County’s 71.5%.

 

· A community thank you board within the school

· An article in the monthly newspaper regarding community businesses and individuals that support GMS

· Distribution of the monthly newspaper to feeder schools, city hall, public library, and local businesses

· Weekly announcements thanking businesses and individuals highlighting their contribution to GMS

 

 



 

 



Component 2 – Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

Template 2.1: Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

(Rubric Indicators 2.1 and 2.2)

Beliefs

We believe that: 3) and 15)

Research based information and data must be used to drive instruction along with consideration of learner’s needs, styles, and preferences.

All students are expected to achieve to meet the standards at a level of proficiency or above.

All students must be given best practices and data driven instruction to ensure achievement at proficient and advanced achievement levels.

All school policies and procedures are aligned to maintain an environment for teaching and learning.

Communication with all stakeholders, internal and external, is necessary and ongoing.

Collaboration among staff and stakeholders is necessary to ensure student success.

A link between the beliefs, mission and vision is established by these beliefs.

 

 

Common Mission

The mission of Goodlettsville Middle School is to provide a safe, caring and challenging learning environment where all students will demonstrate proficiency or above on all state and local standards.

Shared Vision

GMS is committed to creating a community where everyone contributes to quality teaching and learning.

 

School Improvement
Plan

 

 

 

 

Goodlettsville Middle School

300 S. Main Street

Goodlettsville, Tennessee 37072

(615) 859-8956

 

 

Sarah Moore@mnps.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Moore, Ed.D. Principal

 

 

 

 

School Year 2009/2010

 

Goodlettsville Middle School Improvement Planning Process

(TSIPP)

Assurances

 

 

 

 

 

I certify that Goodlettsville Middle School has utilized the data and other requirements requested for each component. The school will operate its programs in accordance with all of the required assurances and certifications for each program area.

 

I CERTIFY that the assurances referenced above have been satisfied to the best of my knowledge.

 

 

 

 

__________________________________________ ______________________

Signature of Principal Date Signed

 

 


Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.1: SIP Leadership Team Composition

(Rubric Indicator 1.1)

SIP Leadership Team Member Name

Leader-

ship Chair? (Y/N)

Position

Name of Subcommittee(s) (when applicable)

Dr. Sarah Moore

Yes

Principal

Action Plan Development Component 4

Richard Jones

Yes

Assistant Principal

Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis, Component 1b

Jacqui Shallenberger

Yes

Numeracy Coach and Math Specialist

Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis, Component 1b,

Component 3, Component 4

Brent Kellems

No

7th grade Social Studies

Component 1a

Sarah Carr

No

7th/8th grade Reading

Component 2

Alison Rager

No

5th grade and MYP coordinator

Component 3

Tiffany Morrow

No

7th grade Reading

Component 5

Tonya Stamps

No

Head Custodian

Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis, Component 1

Ruth Luthy

NO

Parent

Action Plan Development

Judy Atkins

No

Community President, Regions Bank, Goodlettsville Branch

School Profile and Collaborative Process, Component 1

Ruth Gurich

No

Consulting Teacher

Component 1and 3

 

 

Component 1a – School Profile and Collaborative Process

 

TEMPLATE 1.2: Subcommittee Formation and Operation

(Rubric Indicator 1.2)

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 1 School Profile and Collaborative Process

Member Name

Position

Chair

Brent Kellems

7th grade Social Studies

X

Shelly Lott

5-8 Physical Education

 

Tara Johnson

6th and 8th grade Counselor

 

Kris Hadsall

5-8 Chorus

 

Kathy Campbell

6,7,8 Computer Teacher and 7th grade Math

 

Dawn Hickman

5-8 MIP- F

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

 

Component 1 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

Subcommittee 1 Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Subcommittee for COMPONENT 2 Beliefs, Mission and Vision

Member Name

Position

Chair

Sarah Carr

7th and 8th grade Reading

X

Alison Maliszewski

5th grade teacher

 

Misty Palmer

8th Grade Social Studies

 

Laura Youmans

Librarian

 

Victoria Mays

5th grade teacher

 

 

Librarian

Librarian

 

5th grade teacher

 

 

 

 

 

Component 2 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee 2 Chair Signature

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 3 Curricular, Instructional, Assessment, and Organizational Effectiveness

Member Name

Position

Chair

Allison Rager

S

5th grade and MYP Coordinator

x

Dustin White

5th grade teacher

 

Tony Dorris

7th grade teacher

 

Ashley Richardson

5th grade teacher

 

Mahogany Vaughn

Exceptional education

 

Ruth Gurich

Consulting Teacher

 

 

 

Component 3 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

______________________________________________________________________

Subcommittee 3 Co-Chair Signature

 

 

Subcommittee 3 Co- Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 4 Action Plan Development

Member Name

Position

Chair

Dr. Sarah Moore

Principal

X

Jacqui Shallenberger

Numeracy Coach

X

Ashley Jackson

8th grade teacher

 

David Brooks

8th grade teacher

 

Kenlyn Seard

8th grade teacher

 

Ruth Gurich

Consulting Teacher

 

 

 

 

 

Component 4 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

 

Subcommittee 4 Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subcommittee for COMPONENT 5 The School Improvement Plan and Process Evaluation

Member Name

Position

Chair

Tiffany Morrow

7th grade teacher

X

Angel Brown

Exceptional Educator

 

Jennifer Crain

6th grade Math teacher

 

Brandy Stamper

6th grade teacher

 

Tracy Tucker

5th, 6th, 7th grade teacher

 

K. Morris

6th grade teacher

 

 

 

 

 

 

(tab in last cell to create a new row as needed)

 

Component 5 Subcommittee has met to address critical components of the SIP and minutes are on file.

YES

NO

 

Subcommittee 5 Chair Signature

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

 

TEMPLATE 1.3 Collection of Academic and Nonacademic Data and Analysis/Synthesis

 

TEMPLATE 1.3.1: Data Sources (including surveys)

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Data Source

Relevant Findings

1)GMS conducts a parent survey twice yearly asking all parents to make recommendations for any changes that will enhance the academic and social environment of the school and to make changes and improvements Parent/School Compact and the Parent Involvement Policy. In addition, GMS also conducts various student surveys to solicit input from all stakeholders on their perspective concerning safety and academic strategy issues. Some of the recommendations implemented were:

15)

1.

  • From solicited donations for “beautification,” Home Depot gave potted plants which were placed at entrances and various hallways of the school. The outside of the school was also re-landscaped by Gardner Landscaping Company.
  • All teachers are now required to be at a posted duty in the mornings and afternoons to ensure that students may only walk in one direction and at specific times. This has given the students a general routine to follow.
  • Buses are no longer allowed to drop students off before 8:20 am and. students are not allowed in the building until 8:30 a.m. This ensures that proper monitoring is in place.
  • Parents complained about the coke machines in the building and these were removed.
  • The cafeteria has also eliminated much of the sugar laden products that parents did not want.
  • Fifth and sixth graders have all been housed in one area of the school so that they are not exposed to the older students.
  • $10,000 of books and periodicals were chosen by students to raise student’s desire to read.
  • Tutoring was again offered at the parents’ requests. In 2009/2010 GMS began tutoring in January 2010 before school and after school. Tutoring occurred on Tuesdays and Wednesdays through April 2010.
  • Campus supervisors escort students to their destination when they need to leave class during class time.
  • More usage of math manipulatives in the classroom.

1)Survey of all students, including transitional students for any reason(including homeless, displaced, migratory, etc.) of desired changes, feelings of safety, and their academic achievement in relation to TCAP content standards, etc.

Students wanted more pep rallies and dances. GMS teachers have organized academic incentive activities on a more consistent basis in 09/10.

15)Volunteer Survey

Parents would like to volunteer but work and time are challenges. Parents who do volunteer have a limited amount of time. A list of approximately 10 parents has been compiled during the school year of 2009/2010.

School-wide or targeted use of Title I funds survey

100% of the parents and the staff surveyed voted for a school-wide use of Title I dollars.

Mobility Rate

The 48.1% mobility rate creates challenges to a consistent approach to instruction at GMS. The mobility rate has been in the 40+ range for the past three years and GMS realizes that “connections” are difficult to create when consistency does not exist. 2009/2010 mobility rate has not been confirmed as of January, however, the Leadership team believes the rate to be comparable.

Attendance Rate

Attendance at GMS has always been consistently positive. However, a slight drop in 06/07 has made staff aware that attention to attendance rates must also be a focus. Currently, GMS realizes that student attendance is not at the percentage that is expected. It is currently 91.1%. This may change when adjustments are made with the new half day time cut off.

 

TEMPLATE 1.3.2: School and Community Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Narrative and analysis of relevant school and community factors:

The GMS student population is much more diverse than the Goodlettsville community.

 

*I. Student Characteristics

a.The current enrollment at GMS is 482 students.

b.The ethnicity breakdown is as shown below. There are:

·238 African American students

·47 Hispanic students

·20 Asian students

·174 Caucasian students

·3 American Indian student

By grade breakdown the data is as follows:

Grade

5

6

7

8

Total

F

M

Total

F

M

Total

F

M

Total

F

M

Total

American Indian

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Asian

3

4

7

1

2

3

3

3

6

2

2

4

20

African American

19

25

34

34

20

54

23

24

47

48

45

93

238

Hispanic

8

3

11

6

3

9

4

8

12

6

9

15

47

Caucasian

20

23

43

24

21

45

31

16

47

15

24

39

174

Total

50

56

106

66

47

113

61

51

112

71

80

151

482

c. There are 0 % of the students who have limited proficiency as we do not have an ELL population 2009/2010, 78% of the student population was on free and/or reduced lunch.

e. GMS teachers are all 100% credentialed and highly qualified in their current teaching

areas.

f. The attendance rate for 2008/2009 was 94.5%. This indicates that GMS has exceeded the 93% state benchmark for attendance.

g. GMS had 362 incidents of out of school suspensions in 2006/2007. This number was

reduced from 423 the previous year which we attribute to consistency in our

administrative team (this is their third year at GMS). In 2008/2009 the number of out of

school suspensions was 296.

h. The retention rate for 2008/2009 was 44.3%.

 

* see attached addendum

*II. GMS Staff Characteristics:

  • GMS has one principal
  • One assistant principal
  • One school counselor
  • One .5 guidance clerk
  • One .5 Stimulus funded attendance clerk
  • One school secretary/clerk
  • One general office assistant
  • One secretary/bookkeeper
  • Thirty-One certified classroom teachers
  • One exceptional education paraprofessional
  • Five custodians
  • Six cafeteria staff
  • Two campus supervisors
  • One school resource officer
  • One media specialist
  • One media specialist assistant
  • One Stimulus funded.5 Numeracy Coach and .5 Math Specialist
  • One part time NCLB Program Specialist
  • One in-school suspension monitor
  • One part-time STARS counselor
  • One Title I funded Consulting teacher

GMS Faculty demographics are broken down as follows:

·66% Female

·33% Male

·66% Caucasian

·33% African American

·31% Have less than 4 years of teaching experience

·31% 4-9 years of teaching experience

·21 % 10-20 years of teaching experience

·15 % With more than 20 years experience

Approximately 59% of the faculty have a Masters, Masters Plus Thirty, or Doctorate. This includes teachers who are currently attending a post-graduate program.

 

* see attached addendum

III. School Characteristics

Aa a & b. Historical Data and Physical Data

Goodlettsville Middle School was first established as a high school in 1917. An elementary school was later established along side of the high school. In 1936 a new elementary school was built. In 1937 a new gymnasium and cafeteria were built for the high school. In 1945 a new high school designed to accommodate 300 students was built at the same location. In 2005 the old, small gymnasium was converted into three new classrooms to house the growing student population. In addition, four mobile units were brought to the school. The guidance office was expanded. In the fall of 2007 three science classrooms were remodeled and the gym floor replaced.

 

 

In 1986, the 9th through 12th grade students were moved to Hunters Lane Comprehensive High School. Goodlettsville High School became Goodlettsville Middle School with the remaining 7th and 8th grade students. In the fall of 1999, 5th and 6th grade students were added to the middle school.

 

The majority of our students come to GMS from Old Center, Gateway Elementary and Goodlettsville Elementary schools.

c. Environmental and Safety conditions:

 

New fire alarm, security, and phone systems were installed in 2006/2007 to increase the safety of our students and faculty. GMS has an approved safety plan for emergency situations. These plans are reviewed at least twice a year with the staff. GMS staff also includes the emergency plans and routes in their substitute folders so that even if they are absent, the plan is in place.

 

Three new science labs were created out of existing classrooms, thus increasing the safety of our students while conducting hands-on science activities. The floor of the gymnasium was replaced to ensure the safety of the students during athletic events and physical education classes.

 

e. & f. School Day and Year Length:

The regular school year consists of 200 contracted days for teachers, with 190 days of instruction. Teachers have a 7.5 hour workday, which includes 55 minutes of planning time for all teachers. The day is divided into seven periods.

 

g. Operating Budget:

 

The operating budget for the school is set by the Metropolitan Nashville Public System. Financial resources available to support education at GMS include School Board allocated funds, band fund raising efforts, business and private donations, the Title I Program, Stimulus funds and BEP 2.0 funds.

 

Goodlettsville Middle became eligible for Title I funding in 2002/2003. The funding that Title I provides has been used to decrease student/teacher ratio, tutoring, staff development, parent involvement activities, technology acquisitions, and classroom materials and supplies.

 

 

 

h. Per-Pupil Expenditures:

 

Metro Davidson County provides a $50.00 per child operating budget for the 2007/2008 school

year.

 

 

2) and 3) j. & k. & l. Curriculum Offerings and Unique Programs:

GMS is a Middle Years Programme school which feeds into the Hunters Lane High School International Baccalaureate Programme. Students in the 8th grade may also receive high school credit in algebra I, physical science, and Spanish.. In addition, students in the 7th grade may receive high school credit in algebra I. Our related arts program provides opportunities for growth in computer education, art, physical education, and band.

Our 5th graders are taught 7) the D.A.R.E. program by our school resource officer. Our 6th graders are taught the G.R.E.A.T program by the same officer. Our school counselor presents Safe At Last, character education, and bullying programs to the students as time allows. The programs are also presented (in a shorter form) to our parents yearly as part of one of our family activity nights. GMS also has a MIP Fragile class. In addition GMS also coordinates federal, state, and local services and programs by:

Federal: Federal NCLB consultant, receipt of Title I, II, IV dollars 7.

State: Standards awareness training, webinars

District: Cluster support, Parent/family liasons, district training on new

standards for every teacher, technology training and assist for

Schools

Local: the Lions club gives GMS students free eye

Corner stone Counseling provides needy students assistance

With emotional and family problems, Pencil Partners

7. and 19

Tutoring includes morning assistance in reading and math on Tuesday and Wednesday 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. and an afternoon tutoring program which focuses on math and reading. By the end of October 2007, all of our math and language arts teachers were trained in a program called Springboard. This program presents a vertically planned curriculum that was created to increase the number of students capable of attending advanced placement (AP) classes in high school. In addition, our 5th and 6th grade science teachers have been trained in “Hands-on Science” workshops. Our two 7th and 8th grade science teachers have received professional development in the Pathways to College training. All of our reading teachers have also been trained in the balanced reading initiative program established by the district.

 

Parents have been surveyed to determine what professional development subjects would most benefit their family. The subjects parents wanted information on were motivation, improved communications with their child, and how to teach them self-discipline. Videos and books are available from the Parent Room (room 48) for assistance with these topics. 15.

16.

The school counseling program not only coordinates the transition from our elementary feeders schools for the fourth graders to the fifth grade, they also provide high school, college, and career guidance, awareness, and counseling in a variety of ways. By using an on-line program called Kuder Career Planning the students begin in the seventh grade to inventory their interests, personality traits, and skill levels. Using this program the students then do career searches to further investigate viable options for their future. The students continue this program through their eighth grade year. The counselor then works individually with each eighth grade student to develop a four year plan that will guide them through their high school curriculum, based on the results of the Kuder information. This year an additional assessment was given to the eighth grade students in an effort to strengthen their opportunities to attend AP classes in high school and thus, college. This assessment also focused on student interests and skill levels.

 

\

 

m. Parental Support:

15)Parent/Teacher Meetings are usually held the last Monday of each school month. In 2006/2007, Dr. Moore requested permission to use Title I dollars to pay a NCLB Program Specialist a stipend to work on developing stronger parent involvement. The NCLB Program Specialist works closely with the parent volunteers and the MYP coordinator and the Leadership Team to plan the calendar for the year. A volunteer program is being developed using PTSO materials to ensure that parents have many avenues to volunteer. The program allows for parent volunteers to do work at their home or their workplace, thus allowing working parents, or parent without transportation to participate in their child’s education.

 

In addition, parents are invited to attend special meetings for the purpose of training parents on the interpretation of their child’s ThinkLink and SkillsTutor scores. Instruction is also give to the parents to assist their child in using the web-based tutorial computer program, SkillsTutor from their home computer, or any community computer that has internet access. 9

 

If parents have concerns over specific issues, the NCLB Program Specialist lends videos and books to the parent that assists the parent in dealing with the particular problem/issue they are having. A check-out list is kept in the Parent Room. In addition, morning meetings for parents titled “Coffee With the Principal” provides parents with an opportunity to discuss areas of concern or learn about the various activities in which their children may be involved.

19)n. School-business Partnerships:

Office Max, B and T Landscaping, Home Depot, Office Depot, Publix, Kroger, Cornerstone Financial, Target, Lone Oak Farms, Dr. James Bush, Senator Joe Haynes, Exxon, an Eastern Star chapter, Regions Bank, Shoney’s, Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Papa John’s Pizza and other anonymous alumni and private individuals donate materials and resources to the school to support its function.

*IV. Parent/Guardian Demographics

GMS serves a diverse community of stakeholders. Our student ethnicity breakdown at the beginning of 2009/2010 as follows:

  • American Indian or Alaska Nuit 0.2%
  • Asian 4.1%
  • African American 49.4%
  • Hispanic or Latino 9.8%
  • Caucasian 36.1%

 

The percentage of our students who speak English is 97.25 %, thus indicating that most of our parents are from this country. Only 9 students speak Spanish as their first language, thus indicating that our Hispanic/Latino population of parents is very small….approximately t families. These students must be fluent in English to attend GMS.

 

The percentage of parents with a high school degree or less is 50.8%. Twenty-nine percent have some college, up to Associates Degrees; and twenty percent have more than an Associates Degree.

Family Count:

·Married Couple family with children under 18 1,202

·Male with no wife present 124

·Female householder with no husband present 765

 

Household Income:

  • 0-$19,999 21.5%
  • $20,000-$29,999 14.0%
  • $30,000-$39,999 15.5%
  • $40,000-59,999 18.0%
  • 60,000-$99,999 22.0%
  • $100,000+ 9.0%

* see attached addendum

V. Community Characteristics

 

According to the Goodlettsville Chamber of Commerce, the 2008 projected demographics of Goodlettsville 5 miles from the intersection of Long Hollow Pike and Dickerson Road is as follows:

 

Ethnicity:

  • 80.85 % Caucasian
  • 13.35 % African American
  • 1.09 % Asian
  • 0.33 % American Indian
  • 4.38 % Hispanic

 

Economically:

  • $52,014 Average household income
  • 10.7 % Households earn less than $20,000

 

Goodlettsville is located in both Davidson and Sumner. Families that live in Davidson County are served by the school.

 

Some of the significant companies located in Goodlettsville are Regions Bank, Dollar General headquarters, IBP meat packing, Fleming Food Distribution Inc., Tyson Foods and G.F. Puhl Company, Inc., a sheet metal business.


Component 1b – Academic and Non-Academic Data Analysis/Synthesis

 

TEMPLATE 1.4: Variety of Academic and Non-Academic Assessment Measures

(Rubric Indicator 1.4)

List Data Sources

Tennessee Comprehensive Achievement Program Report

 

TCAP Writing Assessment for grades 5 and 8

 

Metropolitan Nashville Reading Assessments (BRI, BASI, DIBELS)

 

Metropolitan Nashville Math Assessment

Metropolitan Nashville District Writing Assessments

 

ThinkLink Assessments

 

SkillsTutor Assessments

Student’s Individual Education Plans

Personalized Learning Plans IEP

Gateway Algebra scores

Physical Science ( For High School Credit, 8th Grade)End of Course Exam

Spanish I (For High School Credit, 8th Grade) End of Course Exam

Unit and teacher made tests

 

Nine week tests

7th and 8th grade semester exams

School suspensions

 

Attendance rates

 

Mobility rates

Free and reduced lunch data

 

Teacher/Staff /Student surveys

 

Report card letter grade distribution

 

State Report Card

ENCORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEMPLATE 1.5: Data Collection and Analysis

(RubricIndicator 1.5)

Describe the data collection and analysis process used in determining your strengths and needs.

Non-Academic Data

The non-academic data is used in a variety of ways. The teacher, staff/student surveys were used to receive recommendations for the following school year. The fifth grade teachers requested that the students change classes with teachers providing Reading/Language Arts to two classes, and the team teacher offering math/science to the same groups. rather than being self-contained. These recommendations were done and reflected in the 2009-2010 master schedule. Some other non-academic measures are school suspensions, attendance rates, mobility rates, and free and reduced lunch data. School suspensions and attendance are monitored monthly. GMS principals meet with parents and students who are suspended or truant. The attendance rate is also monitored by the attendance worker to alert the MNPS attendance officer. The high mobility rate gives GMS an indication of a need to test newly enrolled students. For the 2007-2008 school year, an extra student computer was added to the guidance office to test newly enrolled students on ThinkLink. In addition, new students are tested in DIBELS and the BRI if results of those tests have not been provided by other schools. This gives the school counselor more accurate data in placing new students in correct classes while waiting on their permanent records. The free and reduced lunch data helps define our economically disadvantaged students. This data is used to determine the amount of Title I funding that GMS receives.

For the past three years, GMS has collected data to determine our strengths and needs from all of the sources listed in the previous section 1.4. The TCAP information is analyzed as soon as GMS receives the data from the TDOE. Usually this occurs in August following the spring TCAP test. Prior to the Personalized Learning Plans, GMS teachers plotted the test results on a “level of proficiency” form that identifies each student in the school as “below proficiency,” “below but close to proficiency,” “just or slightly above proficiency,” and “advanced.” When this information is completed, teachers then test each student on the ThinkLink Predictive Assessment instrument, which is aligned closely with the TCAP. Each teacher is given the complete assessment, broken down into mastery of specific performance indicators in math and reading/language arts. Each student’s performance is evaluated and a plan is developed and reviewed in weekly team meetings tailored to the objectives that need to be taught. The ThinkLink is a predictive, whole year assessment. As the state has changed the standards, predictive testing proficiency scores have not been firmly established. Thus, the combination of all assessment instruments is compiled on an Excel spread sheet as the data becomes available. Having focused on the strengths and needs of every student, Skillstutor is sometimes used to assist in further assessment of the student. This computer program tool tests on specific objectives (vocabulary, for example), tells the level of mastery, and then supplies computer generated lessons to remediate this skill (if mastery has not occurred). At the start of each school year, the Basic Reading Inventory test is administered by the reading teachers and student’s reading levels are determined. Reading classes are then conducted according to a comprehensive reading workshop program established by current brain researched strategies. Math teachers are working on word problems in math using real world situations, as this continues to be a challenge for many of our students. The exceptional education students IEPs are monitored by regular and exceptional education teachers to those students receive the proper classes according to their abilities. An inclusion model for students is being established. The formal TCAP Writing Assessment is done by grades 5 and 8. For the past two years, all grade levels are given weekly prompts. This gives extra practice to all students. The writing assessment is used to track our students’ writing proficiency. This gives extra practice to all students. The writing assessment is used to track our students’ writing process and organizational skills to prepare them for the formal TCAP Writing Assessment. Teachers of each grade level are actively involved in using the data to help identify students for before/afternoon tutoring, pullout groups, and specific computer-based curriculum (SkillsTutor) for remediation. In 2009/2010 the district developed a monthly writing assessment that is now recorded in the Data Warehouse so that a student’s academic profile is readily accessible to the student’s new teachers. Initially, the only data available was the TCAP scores. Non-academic data is used to assist teachers to focus on any challenges their students may have with illness, attendance, or discipline issues. Physical science and Spanish I assessments are used to encourage students to tackle rigorous classes in preparation for high school.. The report card letter grade distribution and the State Report Card results are used in assisting all committees to continue to monitor our School Improvement Plan’s effectiveness. In addition, as these tools are public documents, GMS uses them from parent information workshops conducted during our PTSO and family activity night meetings. 19 and 17

In the fall of 2007, Personalized Learning Plans (PLP) were developed by MNPS. PLPs were completed on each student by the homeroom teacher at the beginning of the school year. The teachers completed the PLP using the information within each student’s cumulative record. The PLP gives the teacher a summary of test data and other personal information. The PLPs are kept in the guidance office for easy assess for parent conferences. The PLP has become an additional tool to document student strengths and needs. IEP


 

TEMPLATE 1.6: Report Card Data Disaggregation

(Rubric Indicator 1.6)

 

Report Card Data Disaggregation

 

*The following data disaggregation analysis was used to establish GMS’s student’s priorities for academic performance in respect to:

·Race: Goodlettsville middle School has less than 45 students in the Hispanic, Native American and the Asia/Pacific islander subgroups. Data on the Caucasian and African American subgroups were as follows:

Reading Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 89% in the 2008/2009 school year.

The percentage of Caucasian students scoring proficient and advanced in the TCAP tests for reading/language in 04/05 was 86.6%, 88.2% in 05/06, 97.6% in 06/07, and 92% in 08/09 In three years the overall gain was 11% The three year average for Caucasian students is 94%.

The percentage of African American students scoring proficient and advanced in the TCAP tests for reading/language in 04/05 was 75.1%, 79.3% in 05/06, 88.7% in 06/07, and 83% in 08/09. Their three year average is 86%. the overall gain was 13.6%.

 

Math Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 86% in the 2008/2009 school year.

 

The percentage of Caucasian students scoring proficient and advanced in the TCAP tests for math in 04/05 was 80.5 %, 82.2% in 05/06 87.2% in 06/07, and 94% in 2008/2009. In three years the overall gain was 6.7%. The three year average is 92%.

 

The percentage of African American students scoring proficient and advanced in the TCAP tests for math in 04/05 was 71.6%, 77.3% in 05/06, 77.6% in 06/07 and 75% in 2008/2009. In three years the overall gain was 6.0%. The three year average is 80%.

  • Economically Disadvantaged:

Reading Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 89% in the 2008/2009 school year.

The percentage of economically disadvantaged students scoring proficient and advanced in reading/language arts in 04/05 was 74.1%, 76.9% in 05/06, 88.8% in 06/07, and 85% in 2008/2009. In three years the overall gain was 14.7%.

 

Math Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 86% in the 2008/2009 school year.

The percentage of economically disadvantaged students scoring proficient and above in math in 04/05 was 71.4%, 75.7% in 05/06, and 77.5% in 06/07. In 08/09 economically disadvantaged students scoring proficient and above in math was 80%. Their three year average is 82%

 

·Exceptional education:

Reading Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 89% in the 2008/2009 school year.

 

The percentage of exceptional education students scoring proficient and above in reading in 04/05 was 31.3%, 47.8% in 05/06, and 73.3% in 06/07.In 09/10 the percentage of exceptional education students scoring proficient and above in reading was 73%. This was down from the 76% of 08/09.In three years the overall percentage was 73%.

Math Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 86% in the 2009/20010 school year.

 

The percentage of exceptional education students scoring proficient and above in math in 04/05 was 28.8%, 31.9% in 05/06, and 33.9% in 06/07. The percentage of exceptional education students scoring proficient and above in math in 08/09 was 69%, down from the 07/08 percentage of 77%. The three year average was 61%.

  • LEP

As GMS has no subgroup of LEP learners. Therefore, there is no data for this subgroup.

In 2009/2010 the number of Hispanic students is just under 45. Although GMS understands that this is a subgroup that will not affect our AYP, it is significant for each of these students to receive an interventions that may have. GMS also understands that these students will affect the entire district’s AYP.

  • Gender

Reading Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 89% for the 2008/2009 school year.

The percentage of males scoring proficient and advanced in 04/05 was 73.1%, 77.5% in 05/06, and 88.8% in 06/07., 90.5% in 07/08 and 85.4% in 08/09.

The percentage of females scoring proficient and advanced in 04/05 was 84.8%, 86.9% in 05/06, and 93.8% in 06/07. In three years the overall gain was 9%.

Math Needs: The benchmark of NCLB was 79% for the 2006/2007 school year.

The percentage of males scoring proficient and above in 04/05 was 71.4%, 77.4% in 05/06,

and 79.5% in 06/07, 93.8% in 07/08, and 90.8% in 08/09.

The percentage of females scoring proficient and above in 04/05 was 78.4%, 81.4% in 05/06,

and 82.2% in 06/07, 89.1% in 07/08 and 82.5% in 08/09.

·Proficiency level disaggregation:

The number of students taking the reading/language arts portion of the TCAP including the writing assessment was 472 in grades 5-8. Of these students 25.6 scored advanced down from 33.3%,60.8% scored proficient, up from 57.9% in 07/08. and 14% scored below proficient up from the 8.8% from the previous year..

 

The number of students taking the math portion of the TCAP was 472 in grades 5-8. Of these students, 24.9 scored advanced in 08/09 slightly up from the 24.4 from 07/08; 57.25scored proficient, also slight higher than the 07/08 56.4%and 18% scored below proficient, slightly less than the 07/08 19.2%.

 

·Growth differences between high, middle, and low achievers

High

The percentage of students scoring advanced in math was 24% in 06/07, 34.4 in 07/08 and 24.9% in 08/09. In three years the overall gain was .9%.

The percentage of students scoring advanced in reading/language arts was 31% in 06/07 28.4 % in 07/08 and 25.6 % in 08/09.. In three years the overall loss was 4.4%. GMS is aware that more focus must be placed on our advanced students’ to ensure that their needs are met.

Middle

The percentage of students scoring proficient in math was 58% in 06/07 54.8% in 07/08, and 57.2% in 08/09. In three years the percentage of students scoring proficient has remained about the same..

The percentage of students scoring proficient in reading and language arts 58% in 06/07, 61.4%in 07/08, and 60.8% in 08/09. In three years there was a 2.8% gain of proficient students.

Low

The percentage of exceptional education students scoring advanced in math 04/05 was 3.8%, 2.9% in 05/06, and 3.4% in 06/07 6.4% in 07/08 and 5.1% in 08/09. In three years there was a 1.7% gain of exceptional education students scoring advanced in math.

The percentage of exceptional education students scoring proficient in math in 04/05 was 25%, 29% in 05/06, and 30.5% in 06/07, 68.1% in 07/08 and 67.8% in 08/09.

The percentage of exceptional education students scoring advanced in reading and language/arts in 04/05 was 2.5%, 2.9% in 05/06, and 3.3% in 06/07, 8.5% in 07/08 and 11.9% in 08/09.

The percentage of exceptional education students scoring proficient in reading and language arts in 04/05 was 28.8%, 44.9% in 05/06, and 70% in 06/07, 76.6% in 07/08 and 69.5% in 08/09. The drop in students scoring proficient was, in part, due to the rise in the advanced scores in 08/09 in the exceptional education. .

 

The obvious conclusion to the interpretation of this data is to continue to focus on the growth of our reading and language arts discipline and to increase our endeavors to reach NCLB benchmarks in math in all of our subgroups especially our African American students. We need to intensify our efforts to improve our math instructional strategies in our exceptional education department and continue to encourage development of best practices strategies in all disciplines. 5 and 6

:

 

 

*see attached addendum

 

TEMPLATE 1.7: Narrative Synthesis of All Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.7)

 

*Narrative Synthesis of Data

The subcommittee for Component I analyzed the various data available and compiled the findings into useable information. Targets were established for each of the NCLB subgroups.

The spring 2009 TCAP was used to assess students in the fall of 2009. A close review of collected student data yielded valuable information about student academic performance. First, the data was analyzed to discover apparent trends in student performance and to establish baselines for improvement. Goodlettsville’s NCLB profile indicates that the school met the proficiency targets in attendance. 2008/2009 TCAP targets for reading/language arts and math at the middle school level were 86% for reading/language arts and 83% for math.

The number of students taking the reading/language arts portion of the TCAP including the writing assessment was 492 in grades 5-8. Of these students, 33.3% scored advanced, 57.9% scored proficient, and 8.2% scored below proficient. The students scoring below proficient decreased by 18.2% from the previous year’s reading/language arts scores for all students. Students scoring advanced increased by 11.3%. The decrease in students scoring proficient is due to the increase in advanced and the decrease in non-proficient scores. This gave the school 91.2% proficient scores which are slightly above the NCLB target.

 

Writing was targeted as a goal during the 2009/2010 school year. The benchmark was 90%. The 2004/2005 writing score was 70.8% competent, 76.2% competent in 2005/2006, and 80.4% competent in 2006/2007. In three years GMS increased writing competency by 9.6%.

 

The number of students taking the math portion of the TCAP was 492 in grades 5-8. Of these students, 24.4% scored advanced, 56.4% scored proficient, and 19.2% scored below proficient. There was an increase of 8.7% scoring advanced from the previous year and 1.6% increase in the number scoring proficient. There was a 1.6% decrease in the number scoring below proficient from the previous year. This gave the school a score of 80.6% proficient in math which met the NCLB state target.

 

Summary

Critical Areas of Strength

Students with disabilities in math missed AYP by 1.19%. This moved GMS to School Improvement One Improving. In January 2007, the principal discovered a downward trend of student attendance. The principal (Dr. Moore) designated a front office clerk to monitor daily attendance. GMS’s high mobility rate presents an additional challenge to ensure that students are identified and tracked for attendance. This decision was made to protect the teacher planning and instructional time. The 2006/2007 attendance rate dropped below 93% mid year. With the concentrated effort of the office staff and the faculty, the yearly attendance rate met NCLB benchmarks.

 

The ThinkLink scores are analyzed as soon as the results are returned. Teacher instruction is be guided by the results.

 

GMS recognizes that to meet NCLB requirements additional support in math must be given to our students with disabilities, and our African American males. Our students with disabilities proficient scores rose 2% from 2006/2007 to 2008/2009. This was due in part to additional support given via a “curriculum support coach,” the implementation of the new balanced reading program and the restructuring of the exceptional education department by the administrative team.

 

*see attached addendum

Critical Areas of Need

GMS recognizes that to meet NCLB requirements additional support in math must be given to our students with disabilities. Our students with disabilities proficient scores rose 2% from 2006/2007 to 2007/2008. This was due in part to additional support given via a “curriculum support coach,” the implementation of the new balanced reading program and the restructuring of the exceptional education department by the administrative team.

 

5)The GMS administration and instructional staff realized that the lack of the GMS students with disabilities subgroup making any significant gains in math in previous years was unacceptable. SWD scores rose from 36% in 2006/2007 to 77% in 2007/2008. In 2008/2009 SWD in math scored 69% proficient and advanced. Although the scores dropped in 2008/2009, they were still significantly higher than the 36% of 2006/207. Title I funds both for math manipulatives and professional development have been funneled to assist in meeting this challenge. In addition, GMS administration has changed personnel to that the students have the best possible instructor in math. It is also recognized that GMS’s growth in math for the past three years is slower than reading and language arts gains. Springboard math professional development and additional dollar resources have been required to assist in meeting this area. Changes in staffing have also occurred in the rest of the math subgroups. In 2009/2010 inclusion was begun in 5th and 6th grades. While it was also begun in the fall of 2009, it became apparent that GMS needed to begin this program in the 5th and 6th grades and wait until the 7th and 8th grade teachers had time to be trained and time for planning before we totally enacted the inclusion in those grades.

 

GMS gained 9.3% in reading and language arts students scoring proficient and advanced from the 2005-2006 to the 2006-2007 school year. However in 2007/200 reading scores were at 90% for all students and dropped to 86% for all students in 2008/2009. The NCLB benchmark of 86% was met . This happened although GMS was allocated a full time literacy coach for 2007/2008. The drop could have occurred due to new teachers or teachers using new strategies to them with the balanced literacy approach that GMS is implementing.. However, GMS did recognize that many of these students scored proficient are near the cutoff score for proficient. So, even though the percentage is currently a strength, GMS must continue to focus on raising student’s reading levels by using the Middle School Initiative in reading, tutoring, the SkillsTutor computer program, and continued support for our classroom teachers to use best practice strategies (cooperative learning groups, use of manipulatives, guided reading groups, etc.).

 

GMS students scoring only 81.1% proficient in the writing assessment is an area of critical need. All disciplines are to be using some open-response questions to help students practice writing skills. In addition, all language arts classes are writing to a prompt either weekly, or on a schedule that allows for corrections, editing, and revision by the students.

Each year the principal monitors attendance closely to that a downward trend of student attendance is addressed as it develops. The principal (Dr. Moore) designated a front office clerk to monitor daily attendance. GMS’s high mobility rate presents an additional challenge to ensure that students are identified and tracked for attendance. This decision was made to protect the teacher planning and instructional time. The 2006/2007 attendance rate dropped below 93% mid year. With the concentrated effort of the office staff and the faculty, the yearly attendance rate of 94.1% met NCLB benchmarks. In 2009/2010 Dr. Moore used Stimulus funds to hire a .5 attendance clerk to assist in the maintaining and exceeding of the 93% AYP goal. At the middle of the 2009/2010 school year GMS attendance rate is only 91%.

 

2008/2009 TCAP scores were used to assess students in the fall of 2009. A close review of collected student data yielded valuable information about student academic performance. First, the data was analyzed to discover apparent trends in student performance and to establish baselines for improvement. Goodlettsville’s NCLB profile indicates that the school met the proficiency targets in attendance.

 

In addition to the above, by reviewing all available data, GMS concluded that a concerted effort must be made in math to ensure that all subgroups make NCLB benchmarks. The African American subgroup did not meet AYP in 2008/2009 in math or reading. In addition, GMS must continue to provide students in reading and language arts with best practice strategies in the classroom and extended learning opportunities both before and after school. 5

 

 

 

 

 


 

TEMPLATE 1.8: Prioritized List of Goal Targets

TEMPLATE 1.8: Prioritized List of Goal Targets

(Rubric Indicator 1.8)

 

Prioritized List of Goal Targets

The rationale for each of the following goals is to meet NCLB benchmarks:

1.The students will meet NCLB benchmarks in math by increasing the percentage proficient and advanced scores on the math portion of the TCAP from 80.8% to 86% by the 2007/2008 school year.

The students at GMS will increase their 82% proficient and advanc4ed score on the 2008/2009 math section of the TCAP to the 86% benchmark, or safe harbor with increased focus on the African American subgroup which tested at 75%

2. The students will raise the 86% proficient or advanced reading portion of the TCAP to the AYP benchmark of 89% or safe harbor, or increase their percentage of proficient or advanced to 94 in reading by the 2010 school year. Particular focus will be placed on the African American subgroup which tested at 83% proficient and advanced.

3. The students with disabilities will increase their proficient and advanced percentages on the math portion of the TCAP test from 33.9% proficient and advanced in math to 37.29% to make AYP in 2007/2008 school year. Students with disabilities will increase their proficient and advanced percentages on the reading/language arts portion of the TCAP test from 73.3% to 80.63% proficient and advanced in the 2007/2008 school year.

4. The students will meet NCLB benchmarks in writing by increasing their 81.1 competency percentage in writing scores to meet safe harbor and/or to provide support in reaching the NCLB 90% writing competency benchmark in the 2009/2010 school year.

5. The students will maintain or increase a 93% attendance rate to meet NCLB benchmarks in the 2009/2010 school year.

 

 

 

 


Component 2 – Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

 

 

Template 2.1: Beliefs, Common Mission and Shared Vision

(Rubric Indicators 2.1 and 2.2)

Beliefs

 

We believe that: 3) and 15)

  • Research based information and data must be used to drive instruction along with consideration of learner’s needs, styles, and preferences.
  • All students are expected to achieve to meet the standards at a level of proficiency or above.
  • All students must be given best practices and data driven instruction to ensure achievement at proficient and advanced achievement levels.
  • All school policies and procedures are aligned to maintain an environment for teaching and learning.
  • Communication with all stakeholders, internal and external, is necessary and ongoing.
  • Collaboration among staff and stakeholders is necessary to ensure student success.
  • A link between the beliefs, mission and vision is established by these beliefs.

 

Common Mission

 

The mission of Goodlettsville Middle School is to provide a safe, caring and challenging learning environment where all students will demonstrate proficiency or above on all state and local standards.

 

Shared Vision

 

The vision of Goodlettsville Middle School is to teach all students to develop skills necessary to become lifelong learners and productive members of society

 


TEMPLATE 3.1.a: Curricular Practices

Template 3.1.a: Curricular Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.1 and 3.2)

 

Current Curricular Practices

3.TDOE and MNPS Standards are used and staff is trained in their use.

Curriculum is mapped and prioritized

School has established school-wide student achievement benchmarks

School has implemented a grade appropriate cohesive standards based model for literacy

School has implemented a grade appropriate cohesive standards based model for mathematics

School has implemented formative assessment aligned with the school benchmarks

Support system is in place for enhancing the quality of curriculum and instruction

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

MNPS standards are based on national and state standards. These standards are given to each teacher yearly. The coaches have worked with grade level teams to ensure that all aspects of the standards are understood. All teachers were trained in the new state standards during the spring, summer, and/or fall of 2009.

Team levels meet weekly to review each teacher’s progress. All available data has been made available to grade teams and teachers and student instructional priority is placed on individual learners’ non-mastery.

All students are expected to meet or exceed proficiency or achieve a 10% gain in achievement levels. Students who are proficient are expected to move to an adequate yearly progress level or advanced proficiency. DIBELS has been included to establish fluency benchmarks for the fifth and sixth grade students.

A literacy model using guided, shared, and read-alouds in a reading workshop format is in place using the Basic Reading Inventory Assessment.

Kylene Beers and Janet Allen strategies and materials are used.

GMS has implemented a comprehensive mathematics program using the Springboard curriculum. In addition, Marilyn Burns’s strategies and lessons are used in the classrooms. A balanced math program is projected to be implemented in the 2010 school year.

GMS uses the Predictive Assessment tool, ThinkLink, to assess each student’s level of objective mastery. This assessment tool is aligned with state benchmarks.Formative writing assessments have been introduced which align with the required state writing assessment

GMS staff utilize MNPS training opportunities

as evidenced on the Electronic Register System. In addition, additional training is available using school and system Title I dollars for training that supports our needs as dictated by our school data.

Embedded training and teacher support provided by numeracy coach and consulting teacher.

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Janet Allen, Kylene Beers, Robert Probst

Yes

Yes

Marzano

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

Effective

Effective

Effective

Data not available at GMS yet

Data not available for GMS yet

Effective

Effective

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

All faculty members have been given trained in new state standards .

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 10 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07.

Team meeting minutes are given to administration and documented

Gain in TCAP reading scores by10 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP reading scores by10 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

The Basic Reading Inventory is now being required to use in all MNPS elementary and middle schools. The Reading Initiative was expanded to include the middle schools in 2006/2007.

As the Springboard has just been implemented, data is not yet available. However, math scores have risen from 70.8% to 80.8% from the 02/03 year to the 06/07 year.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 10 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 10 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores by 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores by 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores by 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

As this practice was not fully implemented last year, the effectiveness of this reading endeavor is not yet established.

The use of Springboard math materials and curriculum is being implemented slowly to the math department. However, the increased use of manipulatives has been effective in producing a 1.6% gain in overall math TCAP scores.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores by 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3 % from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores by 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

All GMS teachers are provided were proved with the new state standards book at he beginning of the school year. The district made the commitment to train every MNPS teacher. In addition, the consulting teacher and the numeracy coach assist in mapping out the standard when assistance is needed. The MNPS website also provides support in the mapping of the standards.

Coaches and a district website provide a mapped standards check list for all disciplines at all grade levels in the beginning of the year. The coaches and the administration continue to monitor their usage.

The coaches and the administration meet with the faculty at the beginning of the school year to review the new benchmarks as established by NCLB.

For the past five years MNPS has provided training for the district-wide Reading Initiative .In addition GMS has paired with another middle school to provide training on the teaching of students of poverty.

All math teachers were trained in Springboard by the end of October 2007. All math teachers are encouraged to attend all district provided workshops in the use of Marilyn Burns’s math strategies and manipulatives. The numeracy coach is available to assist any teacher who is open for training.

All teachers are expected to have completed their ThinkLink test using manual tests. A schedule is established and is monitored each year to ensure testing is completed.

Embedded professional assistance is provided via a numeracy coach and consulting teacher

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Teams will continue to meet to use of standards and assist new teachers in their implementation. Team Leaders will review standards taught and report at the Leadership (Curriculum) meeting

Teams will continue to meet to ensure use of standards and assist new teachers in their implementation. Teams will continue to meet to ensure use of standards and assist new teachers in their implementation

GMS will continue to strive to meet NCLB benchmarks by monitoring the S.I.P. and reviewing assessment data.

Consulting teacher will continue to monitor literacy model usage and coach where needed.

Each year GMS will encourage math teachers to implement additional modules until fully implemented.

ThinkLink, SkillsTutor, , TCAP and other teacher assessments will be used to monitor student’s academic growth

GMS has a numeracy coach and a consulting teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Template 3.1.b: Curriculum Gap Analysis

 

Curriculum Gap Analysis - Narrative Response Required

“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality curricular practices?)

Goodlettsville Middle School currently uses the following resources to achieve our social and academic goals:

·TIME: 1. Teachers meet weekly on grade level to share high quality curricular

practices.

12) 2. After school workshops on the use of technology equipment available in the

School, differentiated instruction, co-teaching and other various workshops are offered.

3. Books and CDs on high quality curricular and classroom management

practices are purchased and assigned to teachers to read/use at home.

4. Planning days are scheduled by the district for teachers to plan for the

implementation of high quality curricular practices.

5.The consulting teacher and numeracy coachs are used to coordinate team level meetings so that teachers make the decisions, assessments, and ideas surrounding the School Improvement Plan, but are not bogged down by the time needed for the coordination.

6. GMS is developing a professional learning community to discuss current trends and practices in education.

MONEY 1.

2. SkillsTutor is a computer-based program. The cost for four (4) years was approximately $13,000.00 and was implemented the spring of 2007. Due to contract issues, this intervention program will not be renewed.

  • PERSONNEL:

1. A numeracy coach and a consulting teacher have been hired to assist with

ensuring that high quality curricular practices are encouraged.

12) 2.The administration has used Title I funds to hire a consulting teacher

to support classroom instruction, encourage parental support, assist teachers

in analyzing data. A NCLB Program Specialist working on a stipend establishes extended learning opportunity programs and is responsible for the Title I compliance issues...

3. The school counseling department consists of one school counselor and one .5 guidance clerk. MNPS hires a psychologist who reviews all exceptional education issues. Various agencies provide additional counseling support services.

  • OTHER RESOURCES

1. There are parent volunteers to read to the students, chaperone field

trips, and to assist during some science lab with the students.. IB students

from Hunters Lane assist the fifth grade classes several afternoons a week.

 

 

 

“What Ought to Be” – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

 

  • TIME:

1.Time should be protected both for individual planning times and for

departmental meetings. Additional planning days are needed to complete

personalized learning plans based on all available data. With the new data warehouse this should facilitate the work.

  • MONEY:
    1. COACH materials were purchased for our exceptional education students in math

and reading/language arts. COACH materials were also purchased for all regular education students in math and language arts/reading. The total cost for all teachers to have one class set was approximately $7,600. GMS desires all teachers to use these tools effectively.

  • PERSONNEL:

1.GMS would benefit from a .MNPS funded secretary/clerk. This position is needed for entering school data and monitoring student attendance.

2.GMS would benefit with two additional certified teachers to be able to fully implement inclusion and to maintain common grade level planning times.

    1. GMS would benefit with one additional exceptional education teacher to lower the

student/teacher ratio and to fully implement total inclusion.

    1. GMS would benefit with a program assistant. The physical plant of the school is in

four buildings. Classroom instruction would benefit

with more teacher observations and less class time wasted with issues that do not

have to do with building community or developing teachers who are proficient in

reflective teaching strategies. The program assistant would be in close proximity to

the 5th and 6th grade students and teachers to assist the students being supervised as

they go into the other buildings and portables.

    1. GMS would benefit with the MAC program. Many of our exceptional education students

and below proficiency students would specially benefit from not being suspended

from school for disciplinary reasons. This program would address discipline issues

and increase the school/student attendance rate while giving the student the

opportunity to complete his/her academic assignments.

    1. GMS would benefit from a cadre of highly qualified substitute teachers that are assigned to the schools on a daily basis. With the numerous professional development required trainings and other unforeseen teacher absences, classroom instruction is suffering from a lack of dependable and qualified substitute teachers.

The substitute teachers can serve as tutors for below proficient students when they are not needed to substitute.

OTHER RESOURCES:

1. GMS would benefit from a new HVAS system. Currently the classrooms have

window a/c units which are extremely loud the students cannot hear the teacher

while instruction is being given. (approximate cost, $85,000)

2. GMS needs acoustical tiles in the 7th and 8th grade classrooms and hallways to minimize the noise.

 


Template 3.1.c: Curricular Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.2)

 

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Goodlettsville Middle School’s strengths are a consistent core of teachers who have provided consistency in instructional practices. The current administrations three year term has provided additional support in the implementation of best practices strategies.

MNPS provides almost unlimited opportunities for instructional support as evidenced by the ERO system of workshop opportunities and embedded professional development via numeracy coach and consulting teacher..

The district’s support for the continued development of a standards document is an important strength. This document provides complete guidance to ensure that all of the standards for a particular grade and discipline are taught. The Springboard portion of the Pathways to College grant is a well developed, researched curriculum that ensures continued vertical instructional progress. It provides both experienced and novice teachers with the same guidance for teaching the objectives that need to be mastered. The Pathway to College grant also provides training and materials for the support of the science curriculum. The “Hands-On-Science” workshops have been completed by our 5th and 6th grade teachers. Other MNPS grants support the social studies curriculum. The Teaching of American History grant trains GMS teachers to use primary sources, various texts presented in a narrative form, and the State History Museum to assist students in the mastery of social studies objectives. Two GMS teachers have completed the social studies grant. GMS has obtained official status as a Middle Years Programme school, which is a feeder school to the Hunters Lane International Baccalaureate Programme.

 

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

Our major challenges are to maintain our level of reading achievement and to increase our math achievement levels to continue to meet NCLB benchmarks. One challenge is to maintain consistent administrative leadership. This will allow the curricular practices supported by this administration to remain in place. In addition, the funding for Springboard curriculum and the needed supplies is a support that needs to remain in place. GMS currently shares a reading specialist whose job responsibility is to work solely with the teachers. It would benefit GMS to have a reading specialist who works directly for the principal and balances teacher supported time with direct interventions with students. The same challenge would benefit our continued math achievement. GMS currently only has a MNPS math specialist which is shared by numerous schools.

Curriculum Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

How will we address our challenges?

GMS will continue to work with the MNPS staff to develop a curriculum support team that focuses on the unique GMS school/academic environment and that can react (as a team) immediately to adjust or correct needed curriculum issues to ensure instruction tailored for diversified learners. This means GMS is assessing the role of the shared reading specialist and the time a curriculum peer instructor has in the classroom.


TEMPLATE 3.2.a: Instructional Practices

Template 3.2.a: Instructional Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.3 and 3.4)

 

Current Instructional Practices

11)Classroom instruction is aligned with the standards based curriculum

11)Classroom instruction is aligned with the assessments

Teaching is data driven

Teachers incorporate a wide range of research based, student centered strategies

Classroom organization and management techniques support the learning process

Students are provided with multiple opportunities to receive additional assistance to improve their learning beyond the initial classroom instruction 4

2

Classroom instruction supports the learning of students with diverse cultural and language background and with different learning needs and learning styles

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

Weekly grade level team meetings review lesson plans and ensure that all teachers are to the new state standards. A standard book is given to every teacher at the beginning of the year. Lesson plans are reviewed to ensure that the standards are being followed.

TCAP assessments are reviewed and the school year is started with the knowledge of our strengths and challenges within disciplines and subgroup issues. After ThinkLink testing is done, each teacher organizes instruction around the results, and also develops a personalize learning plan for placing each student in the groups needed for the teaching of non-mastered objectives.

TCAP assessments are reviewed and the school year is started with the knowledge of our strengths and challenges within disciplines and subgroup issues. After ThinkLink testing is done, each teacher organizes instruction around the results, and also develops a Personalize Learning Plan for placing each student in the groups needed for the teaching of non-mastered objectives.

GMS teachers in math and language arts use Springboard developed curriculum that is based on student centered, brain researched strategies. Science teachers use the Pathways to College science kits and text that is based on state standards.

Cooperative learning centers, student led lessons, lessons tied to standards, guided practice opportunities are provided, student work and assignments are differentiated, and students work collaboratively with teachers and peers. The numeracy coach and the consulting teacher offer support in thee areas.

#17

GMS provides teacher assisted tutoring from 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesdays.. GMS provides afternoon tutoring for math, reading, and homework help from 3:45 – 5:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. In addition, many teachers volunteer to work individually with students during lunch or afternoon in an informal setting. .

All students within the classrooms are moved from one group to another as they gain in mastery of skills. After analyzing various formative tests the students are moved either by reaching proficiency in DIBELS! testing, BRI reading skills, ThinkLink gains and/or in classroom daily and weekly tests. Exceptional education students are moved not only in classroom skill groups, but also into regular education classrooms in all disciplines when testing results indicate the student’s ability to progress in that setting.

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes

Yes

Marzano, Allen, Beers, etc., provide data that indicates that students who combine collective intelligence produce greater gains in academic mastery.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

Effective in previous years when GMS moved from SI1 to Good Standing. These measures have been reviewed and reinforced this school year.

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

TCAP scoresng using DIBELS and BRIs.

TCAP scores

Monitoring using DIBELS and BRIs.

TCAP scores

Monitoring using DIBELS and BRIs.

TCAP scores

TCAP scores

Monitoring using DIBELS and BRIs.

TCAP scores Monitoring using DIBELS and BRIs.

TCAP scores Monitoring using DIBELS and BRIs.

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07 The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading. The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07, The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading.

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07. The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading.

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07. The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading.

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07. The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading.

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07 The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading..

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07. The African American subgroup did not make AYP this year in either math or reading.

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

 

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

Standards given to each stakeholder.

All teachers are expected to utilize the computer labs to complete the assessments. The media specialist ensures that all teachers are scheduled for computer lab use. All teachers are trained in the use of and analyzing of the

data instruments.

All data is expected to be used and incorporated into the personalized learning plans for each student and given to the administration for review.

All lesson plans are reviewed by the school principals. The principals and the coaches conduct classroom observations.

All new teachers were given time to go to the Classroom Management Training workshop provided by MNPS when available. In addition the numeray coach and consulting teachers provide support. Unannounced observations are conducted to ensure that all teachers are using research based classroom strategies.

Brochures were sent home to all students. Additional letters were sent to students at or near proficiency levels on the 2009/2010 TCAP test. E-mails and phones calls were also used to communicate opportunities to parents.

All staff is encouraged to attend differentiated instruction workshops and paid by Title I site dollars. Walk-abouts are conducted by the administration and the coaches to ensure good practices are occurring.

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Continue strategies .

Continue using all GMS assessment tools

Continue to require teachers to use all available assessment tools and to communicate those scores with all stakeholders

Continue with formal and informal observations.

Continue with formal and informal observations.

Continue with Title I tutoring as long as these funds are available.

Continue the above listed strategies.


TEMPLATE 3.2.b: Instructional Gap Analysis

Template 3.2.b: Instructional Gap Analysis

Instructional Gap Analysis - Narrative Response Required

“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality instructional practices?)

  • TIME: MNPS provides each teacher 5 professional days per school year to participate in workshops that teach high quality instructional practices. In addition, other professional development days are given for grant funded or MNPS initiatives. Embedded professional development is provided by the numeracy coach and the consulting teacher. All teachers hired are highly qualified. 12/13
  • MONEY: 10% or more of GMS’s Title I budget is allocated for staff development. As GMS did not meet AYP in the subgroup of African American students in math and reading, professional development for our these discipline teachers is a priority. The use of technology to support instructional strategies is also a priority.
  • PERSONNEL:The numeracy coach and the consulting teacher are providing instructional support. A .5 time general school assistant was purchased with Title I dollars to assist in student attendance issues. A computer lab teacher was purchased in October of 2009 to relieve the overcrowding of the related arts classes and support for interventions using technology.
  • OTHER RESOURCES

GMS has two computer labs that are used for student research and testing.

In the past three years GMS has spent over $30,000 in the media center to update student and professional development books, magazines, research areas, equipment, and created a reading area for the students.

“What Ought to Be” – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How should we be allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality instructional practices?)

  • TIME: GMS believes that the opportunities offered by MNPS and the school provide sufficient time for the acquisition of high quality instructional practices. However, additional time before the students arrive for the school year to analyze data and prepare personalized learning profiles would allow teachers to immediately focus on the areas of greatest need in terms of mastery of objectives. #2,3,4

  • MONEY: GMS needs to purchase technology equipment that will allow instructional strategies to be implemented in the most expedient and cost effective manner. Such equipment consists of digital projectors, ELMOs, and interactive boards. In addition, GMS would benefit from having the district technology personnel conduct training sessions after school to ensure that the instructional staff is comfortable and knowledgeable in the use of the equipment.

  • PERSONNEL: GMS would benefit with a program assistant. The physical plant of the school is in four buildings. Classroom instruction would benefit with more teacher observations and less class time wasted with other issues.

The program assistant would be in close proximity to the 5th and 6th grade students and

teachers to assist the students being supervised as they go into the other buildings and

portables. GMS would benefit with two additional certified teachers..GMS would also

benefit with one additional exceptional education teacher to lower the student/teacher

ratio and implement full inclusion

  • OTHER RESOURCES: ThinkLink needs to be continued to assist teachers in the assessing their students.

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

All teachers have the opportunity to use five paid professional days to acquire training in high quality instructional practices. In addition, Title I dollars allow teachers to request training in workshops not provided or paid for by MNPS. The weekly team meetings allow staff to bring up concerns and strategize methods for addressing these concerns. All staff meets so that everyone has a safe environment in which to ask for assistance. The team atmosphere ensures that all stakeholders are important for success and thus, ensures the support of the entire team.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

GMS realizes that our math scores must improve at a faster rate than have been experienced over the past three years. Training for all math teachers and money for math supplies have been a priority for the 06/07 school year. Springboard training has occurred for all math teachers, ETA math manipulative training has been offered both at the district and site level, and additional math workshops are periodically provided at the district level.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

Our exceptional education math students showed a drop in AYP scores in 2008/2009. Therefore for the 09-10 school year, there was a restructuring of the master schedule. In addition a more experienced teacher was hired to address exceptional education math. Inclusion was implemented. It is our belief that the drop in scores in 08/09 resulted from many of Goodlettsville staff moving to the Central Office and the administration having to bring in many new hires. Of the new personnel hired in 08/09, the administration chose not to rehire all of them.

Template 3.2.c: Instructional Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.4)

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

In 06/07 reading, GMS exceeded the 83% proficient and advanced benchmark with a 91.2% proficient and advanced TCAP score. The category of students with disabilities rose 25.5% from 05/06 to 06/07. To obtain these gains teachers met in grade level teams to discuss the above issues pertaining to the team. The teams met on a weekly basis. In addition, mentors were assigned to new teachers to assist in ensuring that good communication is occurring among all of the staff and that the needs of the new teachers are recognized. All of the teachers are encouraged to share new and effective strategies with their teams. In addition, reading teachers across grade levels support reading initiatives by having 7th and 8th grade students read with 5th and 6th grade students. Teachers shared their current lesson plans to ensure that all students received the best practices that the team can provide. These lesson plans were also shared with the media specialist and the peer instructor so that those individuals could pull together supportive materials for the classes. Although GMS did not meet benchmarks for the African American subgroups in math and reading in 09/10, the same strategies were employed.

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major challenges and how do we know

GMS believes that our major instructional challenges are as follows:

1.Protecting planning time.

2.Ensuring smaller class size.

3.Ensuring that new teachers understand how to fully utilize test data results

4.Ensuring that absent teachers are replaced with a quality substitute.

5.Lack of training in the effective use of technology in the classroom to support instruction.

Instructional Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

How will we address our challenges?

GMS will continue to provide opportunities for math teachers to acquire instruction in high quality practices on-site using math specialists, in workshops chosen specifically to strengthen specific math and technology areas using site based Title II dollars, and by attending district provided math, technology, and reading training opportunities. In addition, the exceptional education department will continue to be evaluated to ensure that the educators strongest in math instructional qualities will teach the majority of our students with disabilities. Available dollars will also be allocated for the extended learning opportunities program. All available assessment tools will be utilized and analyzed to ensure that necessary interventions are administered in a timely manner (ThinkLink, SkillsTutor, Edusoft, classroom-generated assessments).

Dr. Moore continues to recruit highly qualified teachers by providing an environment that provides staff support by: providing team mentors, interviewing and asking teachers what their teaching strategies are (interactive, rather than stand and deliver), and soliciting recommendations from other staff members on potential highly qualified staff that they may know from college classes or other environments, purchasing new technology that teachers desire for their classrooms, and hiring coaches to assist teachers with any needs that arise.

14.

TEMPLATE 3.3.a: Assessment Practices

Template 3.3.a: Assessment Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.5 and 3.6)

Current Assessment Practices

Uses student assessments aligned with Tennessee Department of Education standards based curriculum

Ensures that the appropriate assessments are used to guide decisions relative to student achievement

Assesses all categories of students

Provides professional development in the appropriate use of assessment

Provides support and technical assistance to teachers in developing and using assessments

Provides assessment information to communicate with students, parents and other stakeholders regarding student learning

Uses a wide range of assessments, CRT, NRT, portfolio, curriculum based assessments

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

ThinkLink and SkillsTutor are specific performance indicator based assessments aligned with Tennessee Department of Education standards.

Results of tests are analyzed and compared to TCAP results to ensure that the assessments continue to align with TCAP and the specificperformance indicators

GMS reviews all categories to ensure that all students are receiving the instructional strategies they need as evidenced by disaggregated data. 18

GMS has provided training in ThinkLink and SkillsTutor by the above companies. Reading teachers have been trained in the BRI. Training in the math problem solving process was provided to all math teachers by trained faculty members. MNPS provides writing assessment training each year.

17

Both coaches assisted teachers when requested to develop and use assessments employing best practices strategies as promoted by Marzano.

Each year a Parent Night is held to explain the ThinkLink assessments. Parent/teacher conferences, phone calls and progress reports assist in communicating student assessment

TVASS projections and ThinkLinkdata are printed and given to teachers, parents, and students when the data becomes available.

As a MYP school, GMS uses portfolios for continued assessment of our students. All of GMS’s text books and assessments are aligned with state standards. In addition,

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes.

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

The assessments are successful in direct relationship to the classroom teacher’s willingness to embrace the practice. GMS recognizes that this would not be accomplished in the first year that coaches were employed

Effective

Effective

Effective

Effective

Effective

Effective

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

100% of the math and reading teachers use the ThinkLink assessment tool, and SkillsTutor tracks teacher and student usage.

The data sources are the research that the companies have conducted to assure that the assessment tools are aligned with state standards and are accurate in predicting and assessing objective mastery.

TCAP data disaggregated by the state, and district.

Continued training offered by the data team and Paul Changas (data specialist), on-going training in the reading initiative for the middle schools

Continued training offered by the district in data team and, Paul Changas (data specialist), on-going training in the reading initiative for the middle schools

Agenda minutes, administration observations, written log of parent communication

SkillsTutor prints reports on teacher and student usage. ThinkLink produces reports on all teacher classes as well as individual students, MYP requires portfolio production

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07. The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

` Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.95% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

The drop in SWD in math and AA students in math and reading was not attributed to the use of the above strategies. Other factors are being reviewed.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

GMS has 3 computer labs to schedule and use the programs to assess student achievement

All math and language arts teachers are required to use ThinkLink. All teachers are encouraged to use SkillsTutor

Weekly team meetings are held and the assistant principal, Mr. Jones and the coaches works with the teachers to understand strengths and challenges of the various subgroups.

District provided workshops on an on-going schedule, both during the school year and during the summer months

All teachers have access to the designated staff. The Title I Parent Involvement Coordinator, school counselors, and the MYP coordinator are readily available. All have time allocated to assist classroom teachers.

Parent/teacher conferences, parent activity nights, and special meetings are conducted to explain how various tests are used to communicate student related information

Continued data review of all assessments and communicated at team meetings. These findings are then communicated to the leadership team.

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Train new teachers.

Continue to use.

GMS will continue to meet weekly and review all information on each child and the various subgroups

Continue to encourage all teachers to avail themselves of the workshop opportunities. Use of coaches next year is currently being evaluated to assess their usage next year.

Continue using Title I dollars to train new staff after school. Continue to use planning days to train new teachers to effectively use all assessments.

Continue the above activities and seek out other methods to communicate academic achievement levels to all stakeholders, such as e-mails and newsletters. More and more information is being added to the website.

Continue to provide staff with the assessments and the training necessary to use the assessments.


TEMPLATE 3.3.b: Assessment Gap Analysis

Template 3.3.b: Assessment Gap Analysis

Assessment Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required

“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

  • TIME:

GMS teachers are given some time before the start of school to read and analyze past

data in the student records. This will be (proposed in Title II budget) a two day

training in use of available data to create academic profiles for students. When

the data is posted on the State Web site, the new data is disseminated to the teachers

and this data is used to place students in the appropriate classes and establish

objectives early on in the school year for the students.

  • MONEY:

GMS has provided approximately $5000 (Title I site dollars) for the past three years to

purchase the ThinkLink assessment, $13,000 (Title I site dollars) for three

years to use SkillsTutor, and additional dollars (MNPS) to provide portfolio use

training and materials. The district now provides the ThinkLink.

  • PERSONNEL:

A team compiled of the faculty who have time not dedicated to the classroom have

been designated to assist faculty in using quality assessment practices. The team

consists of Dr. Sarah Moore, principal, Mr. Richard Jones, assistant principal, Alison

Rager, MYP coordinator, Ruth Gurich, NCLB program specialist, Jacqui

Shallenberger, numeracy coach and Tara Johnson, school counselor.

  • OTHER RESOURCES:

.

“What Ought to Be” – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

  • TIME: Additional days provided at the beginning of the school year to ensure that all assessments are put into personalized learning plans for the start of the school year..
  • MONEY: Money needs to be budgeted for notebooks to house portfolios. Funding needs to remain in place for the ThinkLink and SkillsTutor assessment and remediation tools.
  • PERSONNEL: A computer teacher provided by the district is needed to assist students and teachers in the compute
  • OTHER RESOURCES:

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Initially, the companies who produce the assessment tools provided GMS with on-site training. After this initial training, GMS staff ensure that all new teachers are trained in the various assessment tools. In addition, MNPS provides five professional leave days for professional development training. Embedded professional development is provided by the numeracy coach and the consulting teacher.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

All funds GMS spends are targeted for professional development and materials to increase our reading and math scores.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

GMS did not make AYP in the subgroup of African American students in math and reading and dropped significantly in SWD in math.


TEMPLATE 3.3.c: Assessment Summary Questions

Template 3.3.c: Assessment Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.6)

Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

GMS has many assessment tools to track the progress of each student. One tool, ThinkLink allows teachers to track the students three times a year, thus giving the teacher an extended time of instruction after the assessment to focus on any weaknesses. SkillsTutor allows teachers to assign a pretest on a specific area (problem solving) and then assign lessons to support the objectives not mastered. Thus, this assessment tool allows for immediate and focused instruction. The portfolios allow staff to provide assessments in a differentiated manner.

Since GMS has used ThinkLink, all teachers have learned how to use the data provided by the reports to drive their instruction. This has been the most effective assessment tool for guiding classroom instruction. The TCAP assessment has been effective at assisting in the placement of students in the correct classrooms, but not overly effective in guiding weekly classroom instruction. Extended learning opportunities allow for a small group of students to be pre-tested and post-tested on individual objectives that our data reveals is needed.

Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major challenges and how do we know.

One challenge that GMS faces is in the area of communication. As most of our parents work and a majority of our students live out of the Goodlettsville community, parental involvement is limited and communication is difficult to achieve with parent on-site visits. Thus, even though the meetings are scheduled for communication of the assessment progress with ideas on how to help the student, good attendance is not always possible. GMS continues to provide varied times and activities where parents can meet teachers and discuss the progress of their children.

Assessment Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

How will we address our challenges? 15

GMS has developed a yearly calendar for parent meetings to allow for planning on the part of the parents. The parent-school compact and the parent involvement policy are distributed and eedback is requested. Volunteers to work with the other stakeholders are solicited to continue to revise and modify these policies as the stakeholders deem necessary.

In addition, staff sets aside extended hours on parent/teacher conference days to accommodate as many parents with their time restraints as possible. Teachers are encouraged to call as often as possible with all pertinent information that may affect their child’s progress. The school and individual teachers send home newsletters to keep parents abreast of school news and activities. Positive information as well as challenges is encouraged to be exchanged. E-mail addresses are collected and this method is often used in communicating with parents. The MNPS call out phone system has been used on a regular basis to communicate with parents.


TEMPLATE 3.4.a: Organizational Practices

Template 3.4.a: Organizational Practices

(Rubric Indicators 3.7and 3.8)

Current Organizational Practices

School’s beliefs, mission and shared vision define the purpose and direction for the school

School is organized to support a diverse learning community through its programs and practices

School provides continuous professional development for school leaders

School is organized to be proactive in addressing issues that might impede teaching and learning

Organizational practices and processes promote the effective time-on-task for all students

School is organized to engage the parents and community in providing extended learning opportunities for children

Organizational processes increase the opportunity for success in teaching and learning at all schools

Evidence of Practice (State in definitive/tangible terms)

The mission is posted in each classroom and review annually at planning days

GMS provides interventions for struggling

readers , classes for high school credit for advanced students, a exceptional education program for students with disabilities, and an opportunity for students to participate in a gifted program.

District training, on-site training, collaborative training with other schools, and individually attended workshops. The numeracy coach and the consulting teacher provide embedded professional development.

The administration meets with the teams on a weekly basis to ensure that teaching and learning are not hindered.

In addition, a Faculty Advisory Committee exists in case any impediments occur that the staff does not feel comfortable addressing personally.

Announcements are not allowed during instructional time. Students are kept in close proximity by grade to ensure movement time is short between classes. Observations are conducted to ensure that students are on-task during instruction time.

Title I funds are used to provide morning tutoring. And afternoon tutoring activities and two busses are paid for so that the students from the distant areas and have working parents can participate. A summer camp was held for four weeks to provide academic support.

GMS reviews the schedule each year to find the most effective way to provide the most needed and appropriate instructional time for all students.GMS went to 7 periods to introduce an independent study period to provide additional time for interventions when necessary.

Is the current practice research-based?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Is it a principle & practice of high-performing schools?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Has the current practice been effective or ineffective?

Effective

Effective

Being evaluated for effectiveness

Effective

Effective

Effective

The 7 period day is being reviewed for effectiveness.

What data source(s) do you have that support your answer? (identify all applicable sources)

Increased TCAP scores in past years.

Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores in past years

Increased TCAP scores

Evidence of effectiveness or ineffectiveness (State in terms of quantifiable improvement)

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07 However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP in addition to the African American subgroup.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP AYP in addition to the African American subgroup.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP AYP in addition to the African American subgroup.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP AYP in addition to the African American subgroup.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP AYP in addition to the African American subgroup.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP AYP in addition to the African American subgroup.

Gain in TCAP reading scores by 9.3% from 81.9% to 91.2% in one year. Gain of 12.9% from 04/05 to 06/07

Gain in TCAP math scores of 6.2% from 04/05 to 06/07

However, in 08/09 these strategies were not enough to ensure that all subgroups met AYP.

Evidence of equitable school support for this practice

Mission statement is reviewed by the entire faculty and staff yearly and altered as ideas are gathered. The mission statement is posted in every room and other visible places in the school

Students are placed in classes determined by their TCAP scores in reading and math. If additional assessments show otherwise, the students are reviewed by the teacher, administration and counseling team to determine placement.

Workshops provided on an on-going schedule provided by the district

A Faculty Advisory Committee is established each year for teachers to communicate any instructional or organizational concerns. In addition, a MNEA representative is chosen by the faculty to communicate between the administration and the staff.

All policies and procedures are found in the teacher handbook, reviewed each year at the staff meeting and applied to all staff.

Students are given student handbooks and regulations are discussed by their homeroom teacher.

Students who are close or just at or just above proficiency levels are identified and tutoring opportunities communicated to the parents in a variety of ways…brochures sent home in progress reports, teacher phone calls, etc. In addition, all students received a mailed letter explaining the programs available with the transportation schedule.

Students are placed in classes determined by their TCAP scores in reading and math. If additional assessments show otherwise, the students are reviewed by the teacher, administration and counseling team to determine placement. In addition, 4th grade students were eligible to attend a summer week long orientation “camp” to assist in making the adjustment to middle school using S.I.P. Funds 6grant dollars. In 07/8 All 4th graders attend an orientation day prior to the beginning of the school year to meet staff. 16

Next Step (changes or continuations)

Continue

Continue

Continue

Continue

Continue

Continue as long as funding allows

Continue to research best practices from high producing schools and make changes as deemed appropriate


TEMPLATE 3.4.b: Organizational Gap Analysis

Template 3.4.b: Organizational Gap Analysis

Organizational Gap Analysis – Narrative Response Required

“What is” The Current Use of: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

(How are we currently allocating our time, money, personnel and other resources and building capacity around understanding and implementing high quality organizational practices?)

  • TIME: GMS administrators have established an organizational chart that describes

each administrator’s duties. The list is given to the staff, thus, allowing the staff to know who will handle various areas, requests, etc. A Faculty handbook is given to the staff and discussed before school every August..

  • MONEY: MNPS provides staff according to enrollment as dictated by the district formula. However, as attendance was a concern this past school year, the administration used Title I dollars to pay for an additional .5 personnel to monitor attendance.
  • PERSONNEL: The general office assistant was added using Title I dollars since our enrollment did not support additional personnel.
  • OTHER RESOURCES: GMS has a small pool of parent volunteers to assist in the classroom, and provide extra supervision during Orientation Days. In addition, there are alumni and other private donors that provide monetary assistance for special school activities.

“What Ought to Be” – How Should we be Using Our: TIME, MONEY, PERSONNEL And OTHER RESOURCES

  • TIME: School counselors and a guidance clerk are needed to be on payroll the same time as the principals to start the school year in order to register new families and prepare for student orientation.
  • MONEY: GMS would benefit with enough money to cover the costs of the “ought tos” in this section.
  • PERSONNEL: GMS would benefit from a MNPS funded general office assistant. This position is needed for entering school data and monitoring student attendance.

GMS would benefit with a program assistant. The physical plant of the school is in

four buildings and three portables. Classroom instruction would benefit with more

teacher observations and less class time wasted with discipline issues. The program

assistant would be in close proximity to the 5th and 6th grade students and teachers to

assist the students being supervised as they go into the other buildings and portables. An

additional campus supervisor is needed due to the layout of the physical plant. This

would assist in ensuring that students would not skip class. GMS would benefit with the

MAC program. Many of our exceptional education students and below proficiency

students would specially benefit from not being suspended from school for disciplinary

reasons. This program would address discipline issues and increase the school/student

attendance rate while giving the student the opportunity to complete his/her academic

assignments. GMS would benefit from a cadre of highly qualified substitute teachers.

With the numerous professional development required trainings and other unforeseen

teacher absences, classroom instruction is suffering with a lack of dependable and

qualified substitute teachers.

  • OTHER RESOURCES: Our school is in need of the MAC Program to decrease out of school suspensions especially with our black males and exceptional education students.

A digital clock system is needed to protect classroom instructional time as well as to coordinate teachers escorting students to outside classrooms, to/from cafeteria, restroom breaks, etc. (approximate cost, $5000) GMS would benefit from a new HVAS system. Currently the classrooms have window a/c units which are extremely loud. The students cannot hear the teacher while instruction is being given. (approximate cost, $85,000)

Equity and Adequacy:

Are we providing equity and adequacy to all of our teachers?

Both administrators have an open door policy, and have given staff access to their cell phones for any need that arises. Periodic staff meetings are held on Tuesday mornings. When time or activities prevent the staff meeting, the principal e-mails the staff on all of the items that would have been on the agenda. A Faculty Advisory Committee exists for the faculty to voice any concerns. This committee works with the administration to solve any faculty concerns.

Are we targeting funds and resources effectively to meet the needs of all of our teachers in being effective with all their students?

GMS budgeted approximately $7,000, in addition to the salaries of the coaches, in 2009/2010 to provide professional development for staff. All teachers are encouraged to use their 5 professional development days. Code 9 and Code 10 days are also available for our teachers who are attending either district or grant sponsored workshops. All math and language arts teachers at GMS have attended a 5-day Springboard training. Science and social studies teachers have available training through the district that focuses on hands-on, best practices strategies.

Based on the data, are we accurately meeting the needs of all students in our school?

GMS did not meet the need of African American students in math and reading and dropped the percentage of SWD in math making proficient or advanced. Our reading/language arts scores surpassed the NCLB requirements for 2007. We believe that with our continued usage of the Reading Initiative, useage of Springboard strategies, tutoring, and coaching we will again meet benchmarks in 2009/2010.


Template 3.4.c: Organization Summary Questions

(Rubric Indicator 3.8)

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major strengths and how do we know?

Our major strengths in the school’s organization are as follows:

Six principals in four years dictated that the collaboration model the current administration employed was “top down management” until staff stability could be ensured. However, Dr. Moore immediately reorganized committees to ensure all stakeholders were involved in leadership opportunities. The committee that met to focus on curriculum, instruction, assessment, and organization at the school is as follows:

  • Title 1 NCLB Program Specialist
  • Numeracy Coach
  • Media Specialist
  • Exceptional education Team Leader
  • MYP Coordinator
  • Principal and Assistant Principal
  • Support Staff Member
  • Parent
  • 5th – 8th Grade Team Members
  • School Counselor
  • Head Custodian

The following opportunities for collaboration of effective organization are seen as strengths at GMS are:

  • A principal who moves about the school soliciting input from all stakeholders, and is available to everyone via an open door policy.
  • A bi-weekly staff meeting where Principal Moore solicits input from the entire school staff and organizes and disseminates an agenda.
  • Weekly staff meetings chaired by team leaders having at least one team member of the administration attending.
  • Monthly meetings of the Faculty Advisory Committee.
  • A teacher who serves as the MNEA representative.
  • Weekly meetings with the coaches
  • Monthly meetings of the Student Council.
  • Monthly meetings of the Leadership Committee.

GMS uses all available data and the information analyzed by subgroups to determine how Title I funds and Stimulus money will be used.

Organization Summary Questions- Narrative Response Required

What are our major challenges and how do we know.

The major challenges of the GMS organizational process currently and from a historical perspective are:

·Parents do not live or work in a contiguous school zone making attendance during the school day and nightly meetings difficult.

·“Struggling” PTS with inconsistent attendance.

·A high mobility rate means that the students are not receiving consistent instruction. Many of our transferring students are not from MNPS schools. When school records are finally received, we find that many of these students are lacking basic skills.

Component 4 – Action Plan Development


(Rubric Indicator 4.3)

Performance Results / Outcomes

Continue

Data evaluated 2007/2008

Title 1 funded

Continue

Training completed 2008

New teachers trained by District

Continue

continue

Made AYP

Completed 2007/2008

Continue

Continue

Completed 2007/2008

Continue

Purchased with Title money 2007/2008

Goal

Performance Results / Outcomes

Met AYP 2007/2008

Completed with Title money 2007/2008

Continue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACTION STEPS – Template 4.2 (Rubric Indicator 4.2)

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN – Template 4.3 (Rubric Indicator 4.3)